georges braque, the portuguese, 1911

georges braque, the portuguese, 1911

To understand Cubism it helps to go back to Cézanne’s still life paintings or even further, to the Renaissance. Let me use an example that worked nicely in the classroom. I was lecturing, trying to untangle Cubism while drinking incresingly cold coffee from a paper cup. I set the cup on the desk in the front of the room and said, “If I were a Renaissance artist in mid-15th century Italy painting that cup on that table, I would position myself at particular point in space and construct the surrounding objects and space frozen in that spot and from that single perspective. On the other hand, if this was the late 19th century and I was Cézanne, I might allow myself to open this view up quite a bit. Perhaps I would focus on, and record, the perceptual changes of shape and line that result when I shift my weight from one leg to the other or when I lean in toward the cup to get a closer look. I might even allow myself to render slightly around the far side of the paper cup since, as Cézanne, I am interested in vision and memory working together. Finally, if I were Braque or Picasso in the early 20th century, I would want to express even more on the canvas. I would not be satisfied with the limiting conventions of Renaissance perspective nor even with the initial explorations of the master Cézanne.
As a Cubist, I want to express my total visual understanding of the paper coffee cup. I want more than the Renaissance painter or even Cézanne, I want to express the entire cup simultaneously on the static surface of the canvas since I can hold all that visual information in my memory. I want to render the cup’s front, its sides, its back, and its inner walls, its bottom from both inside and out, and I want to do this on a flat canvas. How can this be done? The answer is provided by The Portuguese. In this canvas, everything was fractured. The guitar player and the dock was just so many pieces of broken form, almost broken glass. By breaking these objects into smaller elements, Braque and Picasso are able to overcome the unified singularity of an object and instead transform it into an object of vision. At this point the class began to look a little confused, so I turned back to the paper cup and began to tear it into pieces (I had finished the coffee). If I want to be able to show you both the back and front and inside and outside simultaneously, I can fragment the object. Basically, this is the strategy of the Cubists. – from smarthistory

The painting is one of the earliest cubist paintings. While it is frequently mentioned in monographs, textbooks and articles on the artist as well as Cubism, this painting has never been a source of serious controversy. Most of his paintings consist of still lives which are remarkable for their low-key colour harmonies, robust construction, and serene, meditative quality. Cubism is the technique that was used in the creation of the Portuguese painting. Georges Braque introduced this technique of painting in 1911. The painting features stencilled letters BAL and numerals under them. The painter first introduced the still life technique in 1910 before introducing the Cubism style.
While working on this painting, Georges Braque combined the two techniques to come up with the Portuguese. The stencilled numbers and letters in the art are the assertions of realistic intentions of the Cubism technique. In the painting, the stencilled or written letters across the surface represent the most conclusive ways of emphasizing the picture’s two-dimensional character and they also help stress the quality of the artwork. The Portuguese painting marks an interesting stage and point in the development of Georges’ arts. At the top right-hand corner of the painting, there are D BAL letters and numerals under them. Although Georges had included various numbers as well as letters into the painting, they were the representational elements of the art.

By 1911, Braque and Picasso paired up and the analytical phase became full blown. “Man and Guitar” is an example of this phase. It is characterized by the natural colors of brown, gray, and green (Braque). It seems to have many views, the space is flattened, and it has a kind of broken contour. Braque began to use the stenciling technique to create a feeling of autonomy as such in “The Portuguese” lettering. He also created what is exclaimed the first pasted-paper picture by using wallpaper in “Fruit Dish and Glass.”
Braque admired the work of the Fauves, who were a small group of artists that were known for their wild, vibrant art style. Along with the admiration of the explosion of colors, Braque followed the works of Matisse, Duffy, Derain, and others (Bordvick).

Georges braque, the portuguese, 1911
To understand Cubism it helps to go back to Cézanne’s still life paintings or even further, to the Renaissance. Let me use an example that worked nicely in the classroom. I was lecturing, trying to untangle Cubism while drinking incresingly cold coffee from a paper cup. I set the cup on the desk in the front of the room and said, “If I were a Renaissance artist in mid-15th century Italy painting that cup on that table, I would position myself at particular point in space and construct the surrounding objects and space frozen in that spot and from that single perspective. On the other hand, if this was the late 19th century and I was Cézanne, I might allow myself to open this view up quite a bit. Perhaps I would focus on, and record, the perceptual changes of shape and line that result when I shift my weight from one leg to the other or when I lean in toward the cup to get a closer look. I might even allow myself to render slightly around the far side of the paper cup since, as Cézanne, I am interested in vision and memory working together. Finally, if I were Braque or Picasso in the early 20th century, I would want to express even more on the canvas. I would not be satisfied with the limiting conventions of Renaissance perspective nor even with the initial explorations of the master Cézanne.
As a Cubist, I want to express my total visual understanding of the paper coffee cup. I want more than the Renaissance painter or even Cézanne, I want to express the entire cup simultaneously on the static surface of the canvas since I can hold all that visual information in my memory. I want to render the cup’s front, its sides, its back, and its inner walls, its bottom from both inside and out, and I want to do this on a flat canvas. How can this be done? The answer is provided by The Portuguese. In this canvas, everything was fractured. The guitar player and the dock was just so many pieces of broken form, almost broken glass. By breaking these objects into smaller elements, Braque and Picasso are able to overcome the unified singularity of an object and instead transform it into an object of vision. At this point the class began to look a little confused, so I turned back to the paper cup and began to tear it into pieces (I had finished the coffee). If I want to be able to show you both the back and front and inside and outside simultaneously, I can fragment the object. Basically, this is the strategy of the Cubists. – from smarthistory

As a Cubist, I want to express my total visual understanding of the paper coffee cup. I want more than the Renaissance painter or even Cézanne, I want to express the entire cup simultaneously on the static surface of the canvas since I can hold all that visual information in my memory. I want to render the cup’s front, its sides, its back, and its inner walls, its bottom from both inside and out, and I want to do this on a flat canvas. How can this be done?
Georges Braque, The Portuguese, 1911, oil on canvas, 116.8 x 81 cm (Kunstmuseum Basel, Basel, Switzerland)

Cloonan, William. “Braque’s Le Portugais and a Portuguese Nun.” French, American Association of Teachers of. The French Review. 1994.
The Portuguese is oil on canvas, completed in 1911 by Braque. In the painting, everything is fractured. The dock and the guitar player were constructed through so many pieces of broken forms, almost as if they were broken glass. By breaking these objects into smaller pieces, Braque was able to overcome the unified single nature of the object, creating a rare vision. The neutral colors make the content unclear. The painting was inspired by memories of a Portuguese musician in Marseilles. Braque uses wallpaper, painted paper and newspaper, along with light brown and dark tones to bring out colors. Henceforth, you will not see the painting for what it is, but search for its meaning in the objects.

References:

http://www.georgesbraque.net/portuguese/
http://www.people.vcu.edu/~djbromle/modern-art/02/Georges-Braque/index.htm
http://grandcentralpark.org/2019/04/19/georges-braque-the-portuguese-analysis/
http://20thcart.tumblr.com/post/63909823111/georges-braquecubism/amp
http://www.georgesbraque.org/the-portuguese.jsp

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klimt

klimt

Klimt
Although Gustav Klimt and his former partner had a falling out, in 1900, the first exhibit which he created for the University of Vienna, was laid out for public display. It was presented at the Paris World Fair, and he won the Grand Prix award for this piece. He continues the work in the university through 1901, even though it is met with criticism by many locals in Vienna.

All art is erotic. ” – Gustav Klimt

All three paintings were destroyed when retreating German forces burned Schloss Immendorf in May 1945. [13] [14]
Klimt travelled little, but trips to Venice and Ravenna, both famous for their beautiful mosaics, most likely inspired his gold technique and his Byzantine imagery. In 1904, he collaborated with other artists on the lavish Palais Stoclet, the home of a wealthy Belgian industrialist that was one of the grandest monuments of the Art Nouveau age. Klimt’s contributions to the dining room, including both Fulfillment and Expectation, were some of his finest decorative works, and as he publicly stated, “probably the ultimate stage of my development of ornament.” [20]

Klimt
Though the Secessionists were known as a group that attempted to break with artistic traditions, their relationship with the past was more complex than a simple forward-looking mentality. Klimt, along with many of his fellow painters and graphic artists, cultivated a keen understanding of the symbolic nature of mythical and allegorical figures and narratives from Greece, Rome, and other ancient civilizations. With his soft colors and uncertain boundaries between elements, Klimt begins the dissolution of the figural in the direction of abstraction, that would come to full force in the years after he left the Secession. This painting exudes thus a sensory conception of the imperial, powerful presence of the Greco-Roman goddess of wisdom, Athena, and the inability of humans to full grasp that, rather than a crisp, detailed visual summation of her persona.
The haziness evokes the contemporaneous exploration of dreams by Sigmund Freud, whose seminal work on the subject would be published in Vienna just two years later. It is tempting to read Klimt’s painting in the context of Freud’s view of dreams as the fulfillment of wishes, which might suggest that the powerful, imperious woman is the object of male desire, but also potentially that the traditional feminine persona must be costumed in order to attain such powerful status.

Klimt
Klimt’s work proves difficult to decipher, and it appears that one of his goals with the painting was to show the ambiguity of human life, simultaneously representing the themes of birth and death. In some ways, it proves highly ironic, as Vienna at the time was one of the major centers of medical research: along with Sigmund Freud, who had just published The Interpretation of Dreams (1899), it was home to the pioneering abdominal surgeon Theodor Billroth. In this respect, Medicine demonstrates how, despite the great inroads the Secession had made in the four years since its founding, the movement had not decisively overturned conservative attitudes towards modern art in Vienna. For Klimt, the entire affair represented an ultimate public humiliation and rejection; he did not exhibit in Vienna for five years after 1903, and he swore off official commissions and withdrew to take on only private portrait commissions or landscapes for the remainder of his career. His trio of University paintings, born into a firestorm of controversy, met their own fiery fate as they found their way into the collections of Jews and became three of Klimt’s many works confiscated by the Nazis. They were incinerated in May 1945 inside the Schloss Immendorf, the lower Austrian castle where they had been stored, by retreating SS troops.
The painting is principally concerned with the dissolution of the real into pure abstract form. Though Klimt depicts Bloch-Bauer as seated, it is nearly impossible to discern the form of the chair or to separate the forms of her clothing from the background. Klimt was largely unconcerned at this time with depicting his sitter’s character, and even less so with providing location and context, omissions that were common in all of Klimt’s earlier portraits. Klimt’s biographer, Frank Whitford, has described the picture as “the most elaborate example of the tyranny of the decorative” in the artist’s work. The use of gold and silver leaf underscores the precious nature of the jewels Bloch-Bauer is wearing, as well as the depths of the love for her felt by Ferdinand, who commissioned the painting. It places the work squarely within Klimt’s “Golden Phase” from the first decade of the 20 th century, wherein he used dozens of gold patterns and shades of the metal in his paintings to create these glittering effects. Not surprisingly, when the Osterreichische Galerie Belvedere received the painting, it was retitled The Lady in Gold, the name by which it is still sometimes known today.

Klimt
Gustav Klimt was an Austrian symbolist painter, whose primary subject was the female body. His paintings, murals, and sketches are marked by a sensual eroticism, which is especially apparent in his pencil drawings. Klimt attended the Vienna University of Arts and Crafts in 1876, and formed the “Company of Artists” with his two brothers and a friend, after which he was awarded the Golden Order of Merit from the Emperor of Vienna. In 1892, his father and one of his brothers died, leaving him responsible for their families. The family tragedy also affected his artistic vision, which helped him develop his own personal style.
Gustav Klimt (July 14, 1862 – February 6, 1918) was an Austrian symbolist painter and one of the most prominent members of the Vienna Secession movement. Klimt is noted for his paintings, murals, sketches, and other objets d’art. Klimt’s primary subject was the female body, and his works are marked by a frank eroticism. In addition to his figurative works, which include allegories and portraits, he painted landscapes. Among the artists of the Vienna Secession, Klimt was the most influenced by Japanese art and its methods.

References:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustav_Klimt
http://m.theartstory.org/artist/klimt-gustav/
http://m.theartstory.org/artist/klimt-gustav/artworks/
http://www.wikiart.org/en/gustav-klimt
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustav_Klimt

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mountain between black and caspian sea

mountain between black and caspian sea

If you’re still haven’t solved the crossword clue Region between Caspian Sea and Black Sea then why not search our database by the letters you have already!
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Mountain between black and caspian sea
The name Caucasus is a Latinized form of Kaukasos, which the ancient Greek geographers and historians used; the Russian Kavkaz is of the same origin. The ultimate derivation is thought to be from Kaz-kaz, the Hittite name for a people living on the southern shore of the Black Sea. This ancient nomenclature reflects the historical importance of the region: in Greek mythology the range was the scene of the sufferings of Prometheus, and the Argonauts sought the Golden Fleece in the land of Colchis (the modern Kolkhida Lowland of Georgia), which nestles against the range on the Black Sea coast. The ranges also became a major land route to the north for cultural diffusion of the Middle Eastern Fertile Crescent civilizations. The peoples of the region have exhibited an extraordinary ethnic and cultural diversity since early times: the Colchians, for example, as described in the 5th century bce by the Greek historian Herodotus, were black-skinned Egyptians, though their true origin remains unclear. In subsequent centuries, successive waves of peoples migrating across Eurasia added to and were molded by the more established groups in the region. Not surprisingly, a greater variety of languages is spoken in Caucasia than in any other area of similar size in the world.
The Greater Caucasus range extends for approximately 750 miles (1,200 km) southeastward across the Caucasian isthmus from the Taman Peninsula, which separates the Black Sea from the Sea of Azov, to the Abşeron Peninsula, which juts into the Caspian Sea east of the oil-rich port of Baku, Azerbaijan. The vast plains and highlands of Ciscaucasia stretch from the northern foothills of the Greater Caucasus to the Kuma-Manych Depression, running from the Sea of Azov to the Caspian Sea. Western Ciscaucasia consists largely of plains, such as the extensive lowland north of the Kuban River that slopes gradually upward to the foothills of the mountains farther south. Central Ciscaucasia includes the Stavropol Upland, characterized mainly by tablelands of limestone or sandstone separated by deep valleys; the Mineralnye Vody-Pyatigorsk zone to the southeast, where Mount Beshtau rises to 4,593 feet (1,400 metres) from the surrounding plateau; and, still farther to the southeast, the Terek and the Sunzha ranges, separated by the Alkhanchurt Valley. Eastern Ciscaucasia is a lowland traversed by the lower Terek River and, to the north beyond the sands of the vast Nogay Steppe, by the Kuma River. Both rivers flow into the Caspian Sea.

References:

http://www.britannica.com/place/Caucasus
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mountains_and_Sea

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goya francisco

goya francisco

Goya francisco
While it is often said that Spain was at an economic and cultural nadir by the mid-eigh-teenth century, a mere shadow of the splendor and world dominance that had held sway in the previous century, its empire was never more vast nor its international bureaucracy more sophisticated and cosmopolitan. Spanish culture is often defined as if under a bell jar characterized in terms of a “golden age” and the inevitable decline from that moment whereas, of course, Spain has as restless and changeable an artistic history as any country. This is no better demonstrated than by the series of “reforms” that occurred shortly after Goya’s birth, marked by the founding of a new arts academy in Madrid, the Royal Academy of San Fernando (of which Goya would one day become Director of Painting). Eighteenth-century Spain was opened to a great range of international talent with three of the most celebrated artists in Europe employed there in public works during Goya’s youth: Giovanni Battista Tiepolo from Venice, Anton Raphael Mengs from Dresden then Rome, and Corrado Giaquinto from Naples, also via Rome. Goya’s early work in Zaragoza with his future brother-in-law, Francisco Bayeu, introduced him to a charmingly suave and blended international rococo style much dependent on the work of Giaquinto, and it is this part of his training that probably encouraged Goya at the age of twenty-four to go to Rome for a year.
Today, along with Caravaggio, Rembrandt van Rijn, and Johannes Vermeer, Francisco Goya is regarded both as the last of the Old Masters and the first of the moderns. The subversive imaginative element in his art, as well as his bold handling of paint, provided a model for the work of later generations of artists, notably Edouard Manet, Paul Cezanne Edgar Degas, and and through them Goya influenced some of the greatest artists of the 20th Century, such as Pablo Picasso.

Goya married Josefa Bayeu y Subías, the sister of his art teachers Francisco and Ramón Bayeu y Subías. The couple had one child who lived to be an adult, their son Xavier.
Goya also used his art record moments of the country’s history. In 1808, France, led by Napoleon Bonaparte, invaded Spain. Napoleon installed his brother Joseph as the country’s new leader. While he remained a court painter under Napoleon, Goya created a series of etchings depicting the horrors of war. After Spanish royalty regained the throne in 1814, he then painted “The Third of May,” which showed to the true human costs of war. The work depicted the uprising in Madrid against French forces.

Goya francisco
Goya was beset by illness, and his condition was used against him by his rivals, who looked jealously upon any artist seen to be rising in stature. Some of the larger cartoons, such as The Wedding, were more than 8 by 10 feet, and had proved a drain on his physical strength. Ever resourceful, Goya turned this misfortune around, claiming that his illness had allowed him the insight to produce works that were more personal and informal. [20] However, he found the format limiting, as it did not allow him to capture complex color shifts or texture, and was unsuited to the impasto and glazing techniques he was by then applying to his painted works. The tapestries seem as comments on human types, fashion and fads. [21]
The cartoons were not his only royal commissions, and were accompanied by a series of engravings, mostly copies after old masters such as Marcantonio Raimondi and Velázquez. Goya had a complicated relationship to the latter artist; while many of his contemporaries saw folly in Goya’s attempts to copy and emulate him, he had access to a wide range of the long-dead painter’s works that had been contained in the royal collection. [17] Nonetheless, etching was a medium that the young artist was to master, a medium that was to reveal both the true depths of his imagination and his political beliefs. [18] His c. 1779 etching of The Garrotted Man (“El agarrotado”) was the largest work he had produced to date, and an obvious foreboding of his later “Disasters of War” series. [19]

Goya francisco
Francisco Goya, in full Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes, (born March 30, 1746, Fuendetodos, Spain—died April 16, 1828, Bordeaux, France), Spanish artist whose paintings, drawings, and engravings reflected contemporary historical upheavals and influenced important 19th- and 20th-century painters. The series of etchings The Disasters of War (1810–14) records the horrors of the Napoleonic invasion. His masterpieces in painting include The Naked Maja, The Clothed Maja (c. 1800–05), and The 3rd of May 1808: The Execution of the Defenders of Madrid (1814).
Francisco Goya’s most famous paintings included The Naked Maja, The Clothed Maja, The Family of Charles IV, The Third of May 1808: The Execution of the Defenders of Madrid, and Saturn Eating His Children. His etchings included the series Los Caprichos and The Disasters of War.

Goya francisco
He was born to a modest family in 1746 in the village of Fuendetodos in Aragon. He studied painting from age 14 under José Luzán y Martinez and moved to Madrid to study with Anton Raphael Mengs. He married Josefa Bayeu in 1773; their life was characterised by an almost constant series of pregnancies and miscarriages, and only one child, a son, survived into adulthood. Goya became a court painter to the Spanish Crown in 1786 and this early portion of his career is marked by portraits of the Spanish aristocracy and royalty, and Rococo style tapestry cartoons designed for the royal palace.
Francisco Goya was a talented Spanish painter and printmaker, and is considered one of the last of the Old Masters of painting, as well as the first of the moderns. He began his apprenticeship in painting at the age of 14, and his talent was quickly recognized. He first submitted entries to the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in 1763, and then later in 1766, both of which were denied. But, in 1771, he traveled to Rome and won second place in a painting competition and secured employment designing tapestries at the Royal Tapestry Factory. He completed over 42 patterns, which were used to cover the walls in the newly built palaces around Madrid, giving him an immediate royal audience.

References:

http://www.biography.com/artist/francisco-de-goya
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francisco_Goya
http://www.britannica.com/biography/Francisco-Goya
http://www.wikiart.org/en/francisco-goya
http://www.franciscogoya.com/

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jacob lawrence gallery

jacob lawrence gallery

Lawrence taught at several universities including the University of Washington where he was graduate advisor to lithographer and abstract painter James Claussen [14]
Shortly after moving to Washington state, Lawrence did a series of five paintings on the westward journey of African-American pioneer, George Washington Bush. These paintings are now in the collection of the State of Washington History Museum. [12]

Based on diligent research and inspired by Harlem Renaissance artists Augusta Savage and Charles Alston, Jacob Lawrence illustrated African American history through colorful narrative paintings. His subjects included series on prominent figures in the struggle for black liberation, such as Harriet Tubman; his “The Great Migration” (1940-41) chronicled the Depression-era flight of African Americans from the impoverished rural south to northern cities. Comprising 60 tempera works executed simultaneously with unifying color schemes and visual motifs, it depicted heart-wrenching everyday scenes. New York Times critic Holland Cotter once described Lawrence’s oeuvre as having a “sinewy moral texture. that is in the business of neither easy uplift nor single-minded protest.” Lawrence adopted his characteristic simple forms and abstract elements from African art, linking that aesthetic tradition to present-day black identity.
Based on diligent research and inspired by Harlem Renaissance artists Augusta Savage and Charles Alston, Jacob Lawrence illustrated African American history through colorful narrative paintings. His subjects included series on prominent figures in the struggle for black liberation, such as Harriet Tubman; his “The Great Migration” (1940-41) chronicled the Depression-era flight of African Americans from the impoverished rural south to northern cities. Comprising 60 tempera works executed simultaneously with unifying color schemes and visual motifs, it depicted heart-wrenching everyday scenes. New York Times critic Holland Cotter once described Lawrence’s oeuvre as having a “sinewy moral texture. that is in the business of neither easy uplift nor single-minded protest.” Lawrence adopted his characteristic simple forms and abstract elements from African art, linking that aesthetic tradition to present-day black identity.

Jacob lawrence gallery
Browse all 60 panels from The Migration Series and delve into Jacob Lawrence’s art and life through photographs, poetry, and music from the Great Migration, Harlem, and more. The website features the artist’s first hand accounts—clips from two never-before-published interviews with the artist—as well as perspectives from a range of contemporary voices. Continue the story of migration by sharing what you think #Panel61 of The Migration Series would look like.
Learn more at the Phillips’s online resource: LawrenceMigration.PhillipsCollection.org

Jacob lawrence gallery
On the Way, 1990
Lithograph on Rives BFK paper
40 x 30 inches
St. Marc, 1994
Silk screen on paper
32 1/8 x 22 1/8 inches

Upcoming Exhibitions and Programs
Photomedia
May 2 – 13
Reception: Friday, May 5, 5–8pm

References:

http://www.artsy.net/artist/jacob-lawrence
http://www.phillipscollection.org/collection/migration-series
http://www.dcmooregallery.com/artists/jacob-lawrence
http://jacoblawrencegallery.hotglue.me/
http://jacoblawrencegallery.hotglue.me/

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juan miro el perro luna

juan miro el perro luna

Juan miro el perro luna
Colour lithograph from the album Verve vol. VII, no. 27 and 28.
Illustrated in Cramer – ‘Joan …
Colour lithograph from the album Verve vol. VII, no. 27 and 28.
Illustrated in Cramer – ‘Joan Miró les Livres Illustrés’, nr. 25

Juan miro el perro luna
Artist or Maker: Joan Miro
Henderson, NV, US

Juan miro el perro luna
Paysage (Paysage au coq) manifests the constants of this fascinating group of “animated landscapes”, which were produced within a limited period between 1926 and 1927, undoubtedly adding to their interest. The ladder – a ladder of escape – that, due to the effects of perspective, tapers away as it moves up and appears to mysteriously penetrate the sky, thus combining land and mysticism, whilst also acting as a potent axis in the composition. The rooster at the centre is flying or crowing – or maybe both – on the right of the canvas, while underneath it the letter “E” can be made out, possibly alluding to Spain, recalled and yearned for by Miró whilst on French soil. The other objects, a strange wheel, an equally unusual cloud and some stones dotted about on reddish soil, compete among themselves to impart an air of hallucination and mystery to the scene. As those in charge of the Fondation Beyeler, and owners of this magnificent piece, assert, when contemplating it […] “we feel drawn towards the depths of childhood memories, a Surrealist theme that Freud had taken an interest in”.
During the 1924–25 Biennale, the attention to detail with which Miró appeared to dissect each element in the landscape and farming community of his country transmuted into symbols close to abstraction, emblems, in turn, of Catalan nationalism. In 1926, in what was a new shift, the painter impressed another turn on to his Mont-roig-inspired representations; thus giving rise to his so-called “animated landscapes”, in which the Surrealist technique of automatism took on a prominent role. In these pieces, the most popular of which is Perro ladrándole a la luna (Dog Barking at the Moon, 1926, Philadelphia Museum of Art), which employed another Surrealist technique, reflective disorientation, Miró introduced animals in reference to rural life in Catalonia, together with seemingly strange objects. Thus, the hare at the centre of the painting with a homonymous title (1926, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York) appears alongside a spiral, while the dog in Perro ladrándole a la luna is positioned next to a ladder, which also occurs in Paysage (Paysage au coq). In these compositions, the forms – now highly simplified – are outlined against extensive and vivid fields of colours, identified with the sky/earth counterpoint.

References:

http://www.auctionzip.com/auction-lot/Joan-Miro-pochoir-Figura-y-perro-ante-la-luna_C2945E5924/
http://www.museoreinasofia.es/en/exchange-miro
http://www.thoughtco.com/joan-miro-biography-4171788

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mountain and sea bracelet

mountain and sea bracelet

Mountain and sea bracelet
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Breast Cancer Lokai

Mountain and sea bracelet
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Here is a link to a much cheaper knockoff version of these 5 bracelets we cut open, after this video I bought this set so Lincoln could have a Camo one: http://amzn.to/1Q74i3X

Mountain and sea bracelet

“The White Bead – Stay Humble – Carrying water from Mount Everest, the highest point on Earth, the white bead represents life’s highest moments. It’s those times when you’re feeling on top of the world, that it’s most important to stay humble.

“10 PERCENT of net profits will be dedicated to giving back to the community through a variety of charitable alliances.

The name “lokai” is derived from the Hawaiian word “lokahi”, which means “harmony”, “unity”, and/or “to blend opposites”.
Sometimes you’ve hit a low. Stay hopeful.

Mountain and sea bracelet
Daily News said the word “lokai” means balance in Hawaiian.
At $18 each, this normal-looking bracelet is not cheap. However, it has become really popular worldwide. Their Instagram account @livelokai now has 1.4 million followers. Once you explore the hashtag #livelokai, you’ll find over a hundred thousand posts from Lokai customers bringing their bracelet to different natural spots in the world.

References:

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=yrViv-Cew2c
http://www.inquisitr.com/2714347/lokai-bracelet-buzz-do-the-18-bracelets-really-contain-mount-everest-water-and-dead-sea-mud/
http://bellatory.com/fashion-accessories/What-is-Lokai-Bracelet
http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/20541/20160407/bracelet-claims-help-find-balance-water-mt-everest-mud-dead-lokai-sea-balance-beads-fashion-justin-bieber-gigi-hadid-kris-jenner-blake-lively-celebrities-jewelry-marketing.htm
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sh%C5%8Dj%C5%8D

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hopper edward paintings

hopper edward paintings

Nevertheless, his depictions of atomized modern life can help us find the silver linings of isolation. Here’s what we can learn from Hopper during this, incredibly bizarre, quarantine culture.
She began to ask larger life questions; the frightening existential ones we try to not dwell on when scrolling mindlessly through social media or memes of cute cats. Like, what does it mean to be lonely?

Hopper edward paintings
When he arrived in 1906, Paris was the artistic center of the Western world; no other city was as important for the development of modern art. The move toward abstract painting was already underway; Cubism had begun. There, in 1907, Picasso painted his legendary Les Demoiselles d’Avignon. Hopper, however, later maintained that when he was in Paris he never heard of Picasso, who was to become so important for the development of modern literature. For Hopper, the encounter with Impressionism was decisive. The light in these paintings and the thematic treatment of architecture and nature particularly attracted him and were to influence all of his work. His reaction to the Impressionists is directly reflected in his own art. He forgot the dark, Old Master-like interiors of his New York student days, when he was influenced mainly by the great European artists – Johannes Vermeer, Caravaggio, Rembrandt, and Diego Velazquez. The influence of Impressionists, such as Monet, Cezanne, and Van Gogh is directly reflected in his own art. His palette lit up and he began to paint with light and quick strokes. Even in 1962, he could say, “I think I’m still an Impressionist.”
In 1933, Edward Hopper received further praises for the works he had done, and for a piece that was on exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art. His highly identifiable style, and mature painting styles, were some things he had become known for during this period. The gorgeous landscapes, the quiet rooms and empty rooms he designed, and the transitory effect which many of his works posed, created a sense of contemporary life and a new style, which many in the art world recognized, and many praised him for this distinct style he had created in his art forms.

Hopper edward paintings
The best-known of Hopper’s paintings, Nighthawks (1942), is one of his paintings of groups. It shows customers sitting at the counter of an all-night diner. The shapes and diagonals are carefully constructed. The viewpoint is cinematic—from the sidewalk, as if the viewer were approaching the restaurant. The diner’s harsh electric light sets it apart from the dark night outside, enhancing the mood and subtle emotion. [84] As in many Hopper paintings, the interaction is minimal. The restaurant depicted was inspired by one in Greenwich Village. Both Hopper and his wife posed for the figures, and Jo Hopper gave the painting its title. The inspiration for the picture may have come from Ernest Hemingway’s short story “The Killers”, which Hopper greatly admired, [85] or from the more philosophical “A Clean, Well-Lighted Place”. [86] In keeping with the title of his painting, Hopper later said, Nighthawks has more to do with the possibility of predators in the night than with loneliness. [87]
Hopper’s influence on the art world and pop culture is undeniable; see § In popular culture for numerous examples. Though he had no formal students, many artists have cited him as an influence, including Willem de Kooning, Jim Dine, and Mark Rothko. [71] An illustration of Hopper’s influence is Rothko’s early work Composition I (c. 1931), which is a direct paraphrase of Hopper’s Chop Suey. [109]

Hopper edward paintings
Edward Hopper set up his studio in New York and quickly became recognised as one of the best Realist painters as his canvasses revealed the daily life of his compatriots. His paintings reflect a certain nostalgia for what America was. These notions are set against a backdrop of internal conflict between the characters depicted and the place in which they have found themselves.
Oil painting (80 x 80 cm)

Hopper edward paintings
Edward Hopper was born into a middle class family in Nyack, NY, a vibrant hub of transport and industry at the time. The boy was already serious about his artistic ambitions in the age of 10, when he started to sign and date his drawings. Hopper’s parents encouraged him to study commercial illustration instead of fine art. Accordingly, he spent a year at the New York School of Illustration before transferring to the more serious New York School of Art (now Parsons School of Design) to realize his dream. His teachers there included the American Impressionist William Merritt Chase (who founded the school) and Robert Henri, a leading figure of the Ashcan school, whose proponents advocated depicting the grittier side of urban life. Hopper’s classmates at the school included George Bellows and Rockwell Kent.
Hopper’s open-ended narratives have also appealed to writers and musicians. Tom Waits titled an album Nighthawks at the Diner and Madonna named a concert tour after the painting Girlie Show (1941). Joyce Carol Oates refers directly to Hopper in her poem, Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks 1942. Many others have created whole collections of stories or poems using Hopper paintings as starting points.

References:

http://www.edwardhopper.net/
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Hopper
http://www.kazoart.com/blog/en/edward-hopper-in-10-paintings/
http://www.wikiart.org/en/edward-hopper
http://www.dazeddigital.com/art-photography/article/48442/1/how-artist-edward-hopper-became-the-poster-boy-of-quarantine-culture

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lena miro

lena miro

Lena miro
After a breakdown in relations with my friend, Miro was left without high-profile revealing posts, I published my wretched body in the blog, trimming it, as it turned out – in Photoshop. My comrade recalls Lena with an undisguised feeling of gasping and shame. Only under lavish drinking can he afford to recall the strange relationship with the impolite Lena.
Due to constant provocations and unflattering remarks addressed to users commenting on the blog, a large number of visitors to the homepage liveJournal pages blacklisted her, and among them she is considered an antihero LJ. Since January 2013, he has been the head of LJ antitope.
In the same 2011, she was engaged in the distribution of messages in drugs of LJ users. The message contained an invitation to friend and read his blog. Messages were not mass, that is, it bypassed each user.

Lena miro

  • Zodiac sign: Cancer
  • Height: 169 cm
  • Weight: 49 kg
  • Instagram – www.instagram.com/lenamyro
  • LJ – miss-tramell.livejournal.com
  • Vkontakte – vk.com/lena.miro

Popular blogger Lena Miro (real name – Elena Mironenko) was born in 1981 in the small town of Stary Oskol. After graduating from school, she moved to Voronezh and entered the local university, where she received a diploma of translator. After that, Lena moved to England. The girl made a living by organizing parties. A few years later, Miro returned to Russia and began to take the first steps to fame.

Lena miro
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Lena miro
Would you be interested in beta testing Grids ?
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Lena miro
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References:

http://gtavrl.ru/en/blog-miro-leny-chitat-onlain-pochemu-lena-miro-delaet-aborty/
http://www.russianbookshop.co.uk/russianbooks/author/154290/lena-miro
http://community.miro.com/miro-how-tos-45/tables-versus-stickies-55
http://www.biblio.com/9785699575039
http://www.visitingvienna.com/sights/museums/schiele-leopold/

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gustav klimpt the kiss

gustav klimpt the kiss

Gustav klimpt the kiss
The Kiss, however, was enthusiastically received, and was purchased, still unfinished, by the Austrian government when it was put on public exhibition. [13]
It is thought that Klimt and his companion Emilie Flöge modeled for the work, [6] but there is no evidence or record to prove this. Others suggest the female was the model known as ‘Red Hilda’; she bears strong resemblance to the model in his Woman with feather boa, Goldfish and Danaë. [7]

Gustav klimpt the kiss
“The Kiss” is Klimt’s artistic response to the Byzantine mosaics at Ravenna, Italy, which so profoundly affected him. When re-assessing The Kiss for Klimt’s 150th birthday, journalist Adrian Brijbassi wrote, “The Kiss by Gustav Klimt surpasses expectations,” unlike that tiny and underwhelming Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci. After throwing shade on the more famous painting, Brijbassi explained, “[The Kiss] does what a great piece of art is supposed to do: Hold your gaze, make you admire its aesthetic qualities while trying to discern what’s beyond its superficial aspects.”
The Kiss is Klimt’s most popular work and visitors flock annually to see it in Vienna’s Austrian Gallery. At a remarkable 72in x 72in (180cm x 180cm), its powerful presence resounds from the wall as the life-size figures, wrapped in gold, embrace.

Gustav klimpt the kiss
The Tree of Life, Stoclet Frieze (detail)
The Tree of Life, Stoclet Frieze, 1909

Klimt painted The Kiss at a critical moment in his career: in the midst of an artistic panic. He had just received scathing criticism for his University of Vienna ceiling paintings, Philosophy, Medicine and Jurisprudence. The paintings were described as pornographic, and Klimt had reservations about his work and corrupted reputation. Moreover, he had just left the Vienna Secession, despite having founded and acted as the first president of the movement. This group aimed to break ties with the Academy of Fine Arts and its conservative values. The Vienna Secessionists painted “what they shouldn’t have painted”, refusing to remove sexual elements from their works. They explored the power of a delicate touch, an embrace, a kiss, a moment of violence or an erotic scene. Although Klimt left the movement due to disagreements, he remained its main representative along with Egon Schiele. Additionally, after breaking away from the Secession, Klimt organised The Kunstschau exhibition where he presented The Kiss for the first time to the public. The event was received with fierce criticism and ended in financial disaster. However despite this, the exhibition actually initiated the astronomical success of The Kiss. The Viennese government bought the work even before the exhibition had ended, as it was deemed a national interest.
Gustav Klimt’s The Kiss is the archetype of tenderness and passion. This shimmering, colourful, love scene of two faces and bodies embracing each other, is conserved at the Belvedere Museum in Vienna. Although clearly extravagant, the gold leaf covered canvas does not compromise the profound significance behind the work. Artsper invites you to dive into this erotic, ambiguous and mythical work, and discover its fascinating meaning.

Gustav klimpt the kiss
The painter’s works mostly focused on women, so the inclusion of a man—albeit one whose face is obscured—was unusual for Klimt. The figures’ modest dress also marks this painting as one of Klimt’s more conservative creations.
After throwing shade on the more famous painting, Brijbassi explained, “[The Kiss] does what a great piece of art is supposed to do: Hold your gaze, make you admire its aesthetic qualities while trying to discern what’s beyond its superficial aspects.”

References:

http://www.gustav-klimt.com/The-Kiss.jsp
http://mymodernmet.com/the-kiss-gustav-klimt/
http://blog.artsper.com/en/a-closer-look/art-analysis-the-kiss-by-klimt/
http://www.mentalfloss.com/article/64727/15-things-you-should-know-about-klimts-kiss
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tree_of_Life,_Stoclet_Frieze

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