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goya paintings and social justice

goya paintings and social justice

Goya paintings and social justice
After the six years of absolutism that followed Ferdinand’s return to the throne on 1 January 1820, Rafael del Riego initiated an army revolt with the intent of restoring the 1812 Constitution. By March, the king was forced to agree, but by September 1823, after an unstable period, a French invasion supported by an alliance of the major powers had removed the constitutional government. The last prints were probably not completed until after the Constitution was restored, though certainly before Goya left Spain in May 1824. Their balance of optimism and cynicism makes it difficult to relate them directly to particular moments in these rapidly moving events. [38]
Plate 18: Enterrar y callar (Bury them and keep quiet). Atrocities, starvation and human degradation described as the “prodigious flowering of rage”. [7]

Goya paintings and social justice
Goya occupies a unique position within the history of Western art, and is often cited as both an Old Master and the first truly modern artist. His art embodies Romanticism’s emphasis on subjectivity, imagination, and emotion, characteristics reflected most notably in his prints and later private paintings. At the same time, Goya was an astute observer of the world around him, and his art responded directly to the tumultuous events of his day, from the liberations of the Enlightenment, to the suppressions of the Inquisition, to the horrors of war following the Napoleonic invasion. Both for its inventiveness and its political engagement, Goya’s art had an enormous impact on later modern artists. His unflinching scenes from the Peninsular War presaged the works of Pablo Picasso in the 20 th century, while his exploration of bizarre and dreamlike subjects in the Caprichos laid the foundation for Surrealists like Salvador DalГ­. Goya’s influence extends to the 21 st century, as contemporary artists have also drawn inspiration from the artist’s grotesque imagery and searing social commentary.
Spanish Painter and Printmaker

Printmaking is often considered a secondary medium, a poor cousin to painting and sculpture. Goya’s prints are an exception, for alongside a handful of his exceptional portrait paintings from the 1780s and 1790s they represent the pinnacle of his technical and creative achievement as an artist. Without them it is very likely that he would not have achieved his exalted place in art history.
No artist anywhere has been a more acute social observer than Francisco Goya (1746-1828). His “Los Caprichos” prints offer a critical commentary on everything from the health system to the role of religion in 18th-century Spain. They make a plea for social justice.

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes began what would be an enormously productive career at an early age. Born in Fuendetodos, Spain in 1746, he was only 12 years old when he apprenticed in the studio of painter José Luzán y Martinez in Zaragoza. It would take him nearly 20 years and several prestigious commissions to accomplish his goal of admission to Spain’s Royal Academy of San Fernando in Madrid. From that moment, however, his rise to prominence was rapid; appointed Assistant Director of the Academy in 1785, he was named pinto del rey the next year, and, in 1789, three months before the outbreak of the French Revolution, court painter to Charles IV. By 1799, when he undertook his first etchings, he was director of the Academy and one of Spain’s most prominent painters.
First published in 1799, Los Caprichos exposed the vice and corruption that led Spain to be branded as “Black Spain” in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In the 80 etchings that comprise the series, Goya depicted the peasantry’s superstitious belief in witchcraft, the arrogance of the nobility, and the widespread corruption of the Catholic Church. To avoid alienating powerful individuals at Court and to protect himself from the wrath of the Inquisition, however, the artist masked his satire by means of images that would inspire multiple interpretations. For example, in plate 68, two nude witches, one old and withered, the other young and voluptuous, ride a broomstick. The image clearly refers to the belief in witchcraft, but, on a less obvious level, it also addresses the issue of prostitution within Spanish society. This subtle layering of meanings, seen with particular brilliance in Los Caprichos is one of the hallmarks of Goya’s artistry.

Goya paintings and social justice
The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters
The Caprichos give a pitiless image of social and moral standards. No matter who they are, no one escapes criticism -dignitaries, doctors, lawyers, women, old people. Here a little
old lady preens herself vainly in front of the mirror and does not notice how ugly she is, nor the laughter of those present. This could be regarded as a swipe at the queen, Maria Luisa, and her affairs with young men. But Goya was aiming higher than this. One of the basic themes of his Caprichos is the
inability of people to see beyond self-delusion and deceit. The glance into the mirror in this Capricho is clearly not a moment of self-awareness, but the continuation of an illusion.

References:

http://m.theartstory.org/artist/goya-francisco/
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/02/nyregion/new-jersey/02artsnj.html
http://www.pomona.edu/museum/collections/etchings-francisco-de-goya
http://www.all-art.org/neoclasscism/goya9.html
http://www.oilpaintingfactory.com/Francisco-Goya.html

how did jacob lawrence died

how did jacob lawrence died

Mr. Lawrence continued painting until several weeks ago. Through it all, his style has remained consistent, equally balanced between striking visuals and profound content. When asked once how he kept from being swayed by artistic trends, he replied, “I have an assuredness of myself.”
Today, Mr. Lawrence’s work is represented in the collections of nearly 200 museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art and the Art Institute of Harlem. He has been the subject of several retrospectives, including exhibits at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1974 and the Seattle Art Museum in 1986.

How did jacob lawrence died
Following Albers’ example, Lawrence embraced the emotional and symbolic potential of color juxtapositions and conceptualized pictorial space as if an architectural plane of interlocking shapes and lines. Though he generally rejected defining his work as a particular style, when pressed, Lawrence identified his work as “expressionist,” referring to his desire to create artistic narratives which provoked strong emotional reactions in viewers. Art historian Patricia Hills has referred to Lawrence’s style as “expressive cubism” and an “expressive flat collage cubist style.”
Lawrence was, in art historian Leslie King-Hammond’s words, the “first major artist of the 20 th -century who was technically trained and artistically educated within the art community in Harlem,” and she described Lawrence as Harlem’s “biographer.” Harlem, the cultural locus of Black American life following the Harlem Renaissance, was itself an integral subject for Lawrence’s work. Though Lawrence arrived in Harlem at the tail end of the Harlem Renaissance, Lawrence’s early education represented the waning influence of its ideologies, as Lawrence’s most significant teachers were Harlem Renaissance luminaries. Charles Henry Alston, Lawrence’s first mentor and his teacher at the WPA’s Harlem Art Workshop, who came to view Lawrence like his own son, was an artist who came of age embracing the teachings of Alain Locke, whose 1925 The New Negro articulated the Harlem Renaissance artistic philosophy whereby African-American artists should seek inspiration from an African, ancestral past. Lawrence also trained with and was significantly influenced by Harlem Renaissance sculptor Augusta Savage, who instructed Lawrence both at her Savage Studio of Arts and Crafts and at the Harlem Art Workshop. Lawrence’s interest in depicting scenes from black American history and from the Harlem world around him, as well as the Egyptian-like angularity of his figures and his later visual references to African art, ultimately reflect the legacy of the Harlem Renaissance.

After dropping out of school at 16, Lawrence worked in a laundromat and a printing plant. He continued with art, attending classes at the Harlem Art Workshop, taught by the noted African-American artist Charles Alston. Alston urged him to attend the Harlem Community Art Center, led by the sculptor Augusta Savage. Savage secured Lawrence a scholarship to the American Artists School and a paid position with the Works Progress Administration, established during the Great Depression by the administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Lawrence continued his studies as well, working with Alston and Henry Bannarn, another Harlem Renaissance artist, in the Alston-Bannarn workshop.
Jacob Lawrence (September 7, 1917 – June 9, 2000) was an American painter known for his portrayal of African-American life. As well as a painter, storyteller, and interpreter, he was an educator. Lawrence referred to his style as “dynamic cubism”, though by his own account the primary influence was not so much French art as the shapes and colors of Harlem. [1] He brought the African-American experience to life using blacks and browns juxtaposed with vivid colors. He also taught and spent 16 years as a professor at the University of Washington. [2]

How did jacob lawrence died
The full text of Panel 28 from The Frederick Douglass Series reads: “A cowardly and bloody riot took place in New York in July 1863 – a mob fighting the draft, a mob willing to fight to free the Union, a mob unwilling to fight to free slaves, a mob that attacked every colored person within reach disregarding sex or age. They hanged Negroes, burned their homes, dashed out the brains of young children against the lamp posts. The colored populace took refuge in cellars and garrets. This mob was part of the rebel force, without the rebel uniform but with all its deadly hate. It was the fire of the enemy opened in the rear of the loyal army.”
The full text of Panel 22 from The Migration of the Negro series reads: “Another of the social causes of the migrants’ leaving was that at times they did not feel safe, or it was not the best thing to be found on the streets late at night. They were arrested on the slightest provocation.”

How did jacob lawrence died
Trevor Fairbrother, modern art curator at the Seattle Art Museum, called Lawrence “certainly the most important artist in this city.”
“I thought in terms of one work and not 60 works. And to hold it together I wanted to use the same colors in the same way If I had painted one painting and completed it and gone on to the next 60 times, they would all be different,” Lawrence said in a 1994 interview with The Associated Press.

References:

http://m.theartstory.org/artist/lawrence-jacob/life-and-legacy/
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Lawrence
http://m.theartstory.org/artist/lawrence-jacob/
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/painter-jacob-lawrence-dies/
http://www.britannica.com/biography/Paul-Klee

jacob lawrence art

jacob lawrence art

Jacob Lawrence was born September 7, 1917 in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jacobs’s parents moved him and his siblings from the rural south, after which they divorced in 1924 [4] . His mother put him and his two younger siblings into foster care in Philadelphia. When he was 13, he and his siblings moved to New York City, where he reconnected with his mother in Harlem. Lawrence was introduced to art shortly after that when their mother enrolled him in after school classes at an arts and crafts settlement house in Harlem, called Utopia Children’s Center, in an effort to keep him busy. The young Lawrence often drew patterns with crayons. In the beginning, he copied patterns of his mother’s carpets. One of his art teachers noted great potential in Lawrence.
The “hard, bright, brittle” aspects of Harlem during the Great Depression inspired Lawrence as much as the colors, shapes and patterns inside the residents’ homes. “Even in my mother’s home,” Lawrence told historian Paul Karlstrom, “people of my mother’s generation would decorate their homes in all sorts of color. so you’d think in terms of Matisse.” [10] He used water-based media throughout his career. [6] Lawrence started to gain some notice for his dramatic and lively portrayals of both contemporary scenes of African-American urban life as well as historical events, all of which he depicted in crisp shapes, bright, clear colors, dynamic patterns, and through revealing posture and gestures. However, his mother still hoped he would choose a career in the Civil Service. [11]

Jacob lawrence art
Lawrence is among the best-known 20th-century African-American painters. He was 25 years old when he gained national recognition with his 60-panel Migration Series, painted on cardboard. The series depicted the Great Migration of African-Americans from the rural South to the urban North. A part of this series was featured in a 1941 issue of Fortune. The collection is now held by two museums: the odd-numbered paintings are on exhibit in the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., and the even-numbered are on display at MOMA in New York. Lawrence’s works are in the permanent collections of numerous museums, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum, the Phillips Collection, Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum, and Reynolda House Museum of American Art. He is widely known for his modernist illustrations of everyday life as well as epic narratives of African American history and historical figures.
Jacob Lawrence was born in 1917 in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jacobs’s parents moved him and his siblings from the rural south to the north for a chance at a better life. They divorced in 1924, after which his mother put him and his two younger siblings into foster care in Philadelphia. When he was 13, he and his siblings moved to New York City, where he reconnected with his mother in Harlem. Lawrence was introduced to art shortly after that when their mother enrolled him in after school classes at an arts and crafts settlement house in Harlem, called Utopia Children’s Center, in an effort to keep him busy. The young Lawrence often drew patterns with crayons. In the beginning, he copied patterns of his mother’s carpets. One of his art teachers noted great potential in Lawrence.

Jacob lawrence art
Explore all 60 panels of Jacob Lawrence’s great American epic.
This website is produced by The Phillips Collection.

Jacob lawrence art
Casein tempera on hardboard – Hampton University Museum, Virginia
With This is Harlem, Lawrence transformed a busy Harlem neighborhood into a series of geometric abstract planes connected to each other by a limited, consistent color palette of brown, blue, yellow, red, black, white, and burnt-red-orange tones. On the roof of the buildings, rectangles and triangles in red, yellow, brown, and black create a back-and-forth interplay between abstraction and figuration. They appear to be chimneys and various structures and at the same time suggest geometric, abstract paintings. Similarly, the human figures populating the Harlem landscape, created with minimal detail and in the same unmodulated color tones Lawrence used for the landscape, appear to dissolve into abstract color planes as much as they represent unique actors, going about the business of daily life.

Jacob lawrence art
Working with a palette of browns, bright red, yellow-orange, black, white, and blue, Lawrence created his figures as non-naturalistic color blocks, their limbs elongated, their torsos concealed beneath blocky clothing, and their facial features simplified to eyes and mere outlines of a nose and mouth. These compositional decisions eliminate extraneous background details that would take away from the poignant emotions of the narrative. Art historian Elizabeth Hutton Turner has said of Lawrence’s works in series that they were conceived as “image and word” together, with the works’ “poetry” emerging from the “repetition of certain shapes” linking one panel to the next. In Frederick Douglass, the woven basket, made by slaves, acts as a reminder of slave labor, the work of the Black American journey to freedom, and the continual presence of an oppressive past even in a seemingly safer present. The red flower symbolizes hope, and its appearance in Frederick Douglass panels suggests the promise of a better life, even in the most dire of circumstances.
Panel 28 uses simplified forms, a limited color palette, and a clear narrative progression from left to right in tandem with evocative, descriptive text. A group of freed slaves huddle in a shelter, watching the carnage of a Civil War anti-draft riot with expressions of horror and sorrow. Lawrence divided the panel into three dramatic groups. The first group depicts two adults and a child, wide-eyed with fear as they witness the brutality of the riot. The second, middle group shows an older woman, symbolizing an older generation with memories of slavery and the commonality of violence, sheltering a young child who, perhaps unused to such scenes, is seemingly distracted, and grasps the woman’s thumb. The third grouping, a mother, father, and infant, symbolizes the hope and fear of a generation born at the cusp of great change and the promise of freedom throughout the United States tantalizingly at hand. Lawrence later recalled the work’s important political gestures as “some of the most successful statements I have made in my life .”

References:

http://www.wikiart.org/en/jacob-lawrence
http://lawrencemigration.phillipscollection.org/
http://m.theartstory.org/artist/lawrence-jacob/artworks/
http://m.theartstory.org/artist/lawrence-jacob/
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Lawrence

jasper johns flag analysis

jasper johns flag analysis

This sense of “other levels” is critical to Jasper Johns’ method of operation. If he does not create an images, but uses ready-made designs, images, and lettering, what does his work consist of?

Using the design of the American flag took care of a great deal for me because I didn’t have to design it. So I went on to similar things like the targets – things the mind already knows. That gave me room to work on other levels.”

Jasper johns flag analysis
In November 2014 the encaustic Flag (1983) was auctioned off for $36,000,000 at Sotheby’s New York.
The work measures 107.3 centimetres (42.2 in) by 153.8 centimetres (60.6 in). It is made using encaustic, oil paint, and newsprint collage on three separate canvases, mounted on a plywood board. The painting reflects the three colors of the US flag: red, white and blue; the flag is depicted in the form it took between 1912 and 1959, with 48 white stars on a blue canton representing the then-US states (excluding Alaska and Hawaii), and with thirteen red and white stripes. Newsprint is visible under the stripes. Reading the texts, it is clear that the newsprint was not selected at random: Johns steered clear of headlines, or national or political news, and used inconsequential articles or adverts. The painting has a rough-textured surface, and the 48 stars are not identical. It is dated 1954 on its reverse.

Gallery label from “Collection 1940s—1970s”, 2019

“It all began…with my painting a picture of an American flag,” Johns remarked in 1959 in reference to this work. Flag was made on a cut bedsheet using oil paint and then encaustic, a method involving pigmented melted wax. Johns dipped strips of cloth and newsprint into the hot wax and then affixed them to the sheet to fill in a penciled outline of the flag. The result is a picture whose process is registered on its surface, a focus on materiality at odds with the expressionistic gestures dominant in painting at the time of Flag’s making. Johns went on to use encaustic to render familiar forms—flags, targets, numbers, letters, and a map of the United States—time and again throughout his career.

Jasper johns flag analysis
“Flag is covered with a lush array of drips and fleshy brushstrokes, initially confirming Johns’s kinship with mid-century American painting. Yet Johns’s motif and technique tell a different story – one of endings and beginnings, and the passage that comes in between. Begun in the fashionable medium of oil-based enamel paint, Flag was completed using the anachronistic medium of encaustic in which pigment is mixed with hot wax and, in Flag’s case, strips of newspaper and fabric to which the coloured encaustic adhered. As Johns explained it, encaustic allowed him to be more efficient and, at the same time, more deliberate in his gestures. In other words, because pigmented wax sets quickly, Johns could add another mark or strip of saturated paper or cloth with the assurance that any previously laid marks would remain unaffected. In this way, each discrete trace was preserved, effectively embalmed.
“Although Johns was loath to admit it, something else was preserved in Flag too. For while it established his reputation as an artist and delivered him from his origins in the agrarian South, it also affirmed the influence of these roots on his thinking. As the artist belatedly revealed in an interview in 1990. “In Savannah, Georgia, in a park, there is a statue of Sergeant William Jasper. Once I was walking through this park with my father, and he said that we were named for him. Whether or not that is in fact true or not, I don’t know. Sergeant Jasper lost his life raising the American flag over a fort.’”

Jasper johns flag analysis
So, just to correct a widely-held Art World myth, Jasper Johns is not descended from a hero who rescued an American flag. Yes, Johns is named for a patriot who saved a flag, but it was the one you see above, not the revolutionary stars and stripes (see example below)
In regards to Johns’ flags, when seeing them in person It is interesting to look closely and see the fragments of yellowed newspaper text peeking through. In the case of the 1967 flag on view at The Broad in Los Angeles, there are bits and pieces of the New York Times. Yes, these words were once part of a coherent front page, carefully contextualized and ordered. In a Johns flag painting they are reduced to fragments and gibberish, organized with frustrating subjectivity by a creative mind. Like the nervous laughter Johns emits when talking about the letter from his Aunt Gladys, the imagery of his flags is meant to deflect further exploration. Bits and pieces are all you can expect to get.

References:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_(painting)
http://www.moma.org/collection/works/78805
http://www.phaidon.com/agenda/art/articles/2014/july/29/the-incredible-story-behind-flag-by-jasper-johns/
http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_59591fb3e4b0f078efd98adf
http://theoria.art-zoo.com/interview-with-david-sylvester-jasper-johns/

how to pronounce egon schiele

how to pronounce egon schiele

How to pronounce egon schiele
So, do you pronounce his first name like “E-gone” or “Egg-on” or? and what about his last name?
Egon Schiele was a Austrian artist in the early 20th century. I love his artwork so I want to pronounce his name correctly 🙂

How to pronounce egon schiele
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As of its initial launch date in 2018, Egon Schiele Online includes entries for Schiele’s paintings, sketchbooks, graphics and sculptures. Entries for the watercolors and drawings are currently being edited. All online entries have been updated to include artworks authenticated since the last print edition, as well as updates of the bibliographical, exhibition and auction histories for every work. Further updates will be made on a regular basis. Egon Schiele Online will eventually be expanded to include advanced searches and sorts, links to ancillary documents and images, and more detailed provenance information, especially as regards collectors persecuted during the Holocaust.

How to pronounce egon schiele
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation/Art Resource, NY
Ernst Ploil, Vienna

How to pronounce egon schiele
The most transgressive works here are not, as you might expect, the drawings of women masturbating (embracing other women). They are the watercolors of pregnant women, unexpectedly clinical Madonnas with weary, desperate faces. (The book tells us that Schiele obtained access to their hospital rooms by providing the doctor with an oil painting.) There is also a startling image of a newborn baby who seems to have tumbled from the birth canal right onto the page.
The Austrian artist Egon Schiele (1890-1918) was not what you would call a feminist. His drawings and watercolors show women, including teenage prostitutes, in poses both awkward and erotic. He slept with some of his models, impregnating one of them, and went to jail on charges (later dropped) of abducting and molesting a 14-year-old girl. At the very least he was a product of a patriarchal Austrian culture that found female sexuality mysterious and threatening — one that insisted upon the purity of upper-class brides but made Vienna the streetwalking capital of Europe.

How to pronounce egon schiele
Egon von Fürstenberg was royalty. They hold the title Prince of Fürstenberg. Egon was born as the child of Edoardo Agnelli (industrialist) on June 29th, 1946. They breathed their last breath on June 11th, 2004.
What does the name Egon mean? Find out below.

References:

http://egonschieleonline.org/biography
http://nypost.com/2014/10/09/egon-schieles-revolutionary-art-on-display-at-the-neue/
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/02/arts/design/egon-schieles-women-at-galerie-st-etienne.html
http://www.names.org/n/egon/about
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Joan_Mir%C3%B3

lichtenstein pop art

lichtenstein pop art

Besides embodying the cultural prejudice against comic books as vehicles of art, examples like Lichtenstein’s appropriation of the vocabulary of comics highlight the importance of taking publication format in consideration when defining comics, as well as the political economy implied by specific types of historical publications, in this case the American mainstream comic book. To what extent was National Periodical Publications (later DC) responsible for the rejection of the roles of Kanigher and Novick as artists in their own right by not granting them full authorial credit on the publication itself?” [50]

His most celebrated image is arguably Whaam! (1963, Tate Modern, London [33] ), one of the earliest known examples of pop art, adapted from a comic-book panel drawn by Irv Novick in a 1962 issue of DC Comics’ All-American Men of War. [34] The painting depicts a fighter aircraft firing a rocket into an enemy plane, with a red-and-yellow explosion. The cartoon style is heightened by the use of the onomatopoeic lettering “Whaam!” and the boxed caption “I pressed the fire control . and ahead of me rockets blazed through the sky . “ This diptych is large in scale, measuring 1.7 x 4.0 m (5 ft 7 in x 13 ft 4 in). [33] Whaam follows the comic strip-based themes of some of his previous paintings and is part of a body of war-themed work created between 1962 and 1964. It is one of his two notable large war-themed paintings. It was purchased by the Tate Gallery in 1966, after being exhibited at the Leo Castelli Gallery in 1963, and (now at the Tate Modern) has remained in their collection ever since. In 1968, the Darmstadt entrepreneur Karl Ströher acquired several major works by Lichtenstein, such as Nurse (1964), Compositions I (1964), We rose up slowly (1964) and Yellow and Green Brushstrokes (1966). After being on loan at the Hessiches Landesmuseum Darmstadt for several years, the founding director of the Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt, Peter Iden, was able to acquire a total of 87 works [35] from the Ströher collection [36] in 1981, primarily American Pop Art and Minimal Art for the museum under construction until 1991. [37]

Lichtenstein pop art
Although best known as a painter, he made different types of art including sculpture, murals, prints and ceramics.
Cartoons, comics and big bangs! Explore the explosive art of pop artist Roy Lichtenstein

Lichtenstein pop art
Roy Lichtenstein was one of the first American Pop artists to achieve widespread renown, and he became a lightning rod for criticism of the movement. His early work ranged widely in style and subject matter, and displayed considerable understanding of modernist painting: Lichtenstein would often maintain that he was as interested in the abstract qualities of his images as he was in their subject matter. However, the mature Pop style he arrived at in 1961, which was inspired by comic strips, was greeted by accusations of banality, lack of originality, and, later, even copying. His high-impact, iconic images have since become synonymous with Pop art, and his method of creating images, which blended aspects of mechanical reproduction and drawing by hand, has become central to critics’ understanding of the significance of the movement.
American Painter, Sculptor, and Lithographer

Lichtenstein pop art
Introduction Roy Fox Lichtenstein (; October 27, 1923 – September 29, 1997) was an American pop artist. During the 1960s, along with Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and James Rosenquist among others, he became a leading figure in the new art movement. His work defined the premise of pop art through parody. Inspired by the comic strip, Lichtenstein produced precise compositions that documented while they parodied, often in a tongue-in-cheek manner. His work was influenced by popular advertising and the comic book style. He described pop art as “not ‘American’ painting but actually industrial painting”. His paintings were exhibited at the Leo Castelli Gallery in New York City. Whaam! and Drowning Girl are generally regarded as Lichtenstein’s most famous works, with Oh, Jeff. I Love You, Too. But. arguably third. Drowning Girl, Whaam! and Look Mickey are regarded as his most influential works. His most expensive piece is Masterpiece, which was sold for $165 million in January 2017. Wikidata Q151679
Lichtenstein soon turned his attention from the clichés of commercial print culture to the aesthetic clichés of high art. 4 With bold, graphic simulations of brushstrokes in prints like Brushstroke and Brushstrokes, for example, he parodied the autographic mark-making of Abstract Expressionism. Yet where Jackson Pollock had been seen to imbue his skeins of paint with a bravura energy and force, Lichtenstein turned that device into something clichéd, commercial, and reproducible. “Visible brushstrokes in a painting convey a sense of grand gesture; but in my hands, the brushstroke becomes a depiction of a grand gesture,” he later said. 5

Lichtenstein pop art
When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.
When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

References:

http://www.tate.org.uk/kids/explore/who-is/who-roy-lichtenstein
http://m.theartstory.org/artist/lichtenstein-roy/
http://www.moma.org/artists/3542
http://www.artsy.net/artist/roy-lichtenstein
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Lichtenstein

miro 942

miro 942

Miro 942
19 x 8.5 ET 35 front
19 x 9.5 ET 33 rear
NEW LOWERED PRICE!

Miro 942
Personnage au rectangle blanc, 1928
With its collections of ancient, modern and contemporary art, the Musée de Grenoble offers you a chance to traverse the history of western painting from the 13th to the 20th centuries. Included are major masterpieces of classical Flemish, Dutch, Italian and Spanish painting; one of 20th century Europe’s richest collections; and all the great post-1945 contemporary art trends, right up to the most recent artworks of the 2000s.

References:

http://www.museedegrenoble.fr/TPL_CODE/TPL_OEUVRE/PAR_TPL_IDENTIFIANT/158/942-les-collections.htm
http://www.europosters.es/joan-miro/

klee kai

klee kai

Klee kai
The Alaskan klee kai is an intelligent, high-activity dog. However, they are not “hyper.” Unlike other husky breeds, they are highly trainable and make good watchdogs. Also unlike their cousins, they are suspicious of strangers. They require their owner’s attention and are most likely found at their owner’s side. They “talk back” and howl, but are not excessive barkers. Occasionally, a klee kai will be people-shy. This temperament is considered undesirable and dogs with this temperament are neutered.
Exercise Requirements: 20-40 minutes/day
Energy Level: Very energetic
Longevity Range: 15 – 20 yrs.
Tendency to Bark: Moderate
Tendency to Dig: Moderate Social/Attention Needs: High

Klee kai
In any case, the best step when determining your dog’s diet is to talk to your veterinarian. Your vet will work with you to find a diet that is best suited for your Alaskan Klee Kai.
The Alaskan Klee Kai has a life expectancy of 10-13 years, according to Pet MD . “While it’s true that the Alaskan Klee Kai aren’t typically associated with a long list of health conditions per se, it’s important to remember that some issues simply may not have yet been discovered due to the relative young age of the breed,” stated Alaskan Klee Kai 101 . As the breed grows, and there is a larger sample size, there will be more information about prevalent health conditions.

Klee kai
If you are ready for the challenge of this northern native, read on for a complete guide to feeding, socializing, and much more…
While double coated dogs are known for their shedding this particular breed sheds only moderately.

Klee kai
Small, smart, and energetic, the Alaskan Klee Kai is a relatively new breed that looks like a smaller version of the Siberian Husky, and even the name “Klee Kai” comes from an Inuit term meaning “small dog.”
(Picture Credit: Haydn West – PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images)

Klee kai
At that time, in another happy twist of fate, Linda Spurlin from Alaska happened to be visiting relatives in Oklahoma and saw the puppies. She was immediately taken with this small Siberian Husky-type and it set her thinking. Back in her native Alaska, Linda set her mind to how best to recreate these puppies, given that the breed of the original father wasn’t known. Her solution avoided the path of breeding together the smallest examples or ‘dwarves’ of the Siberian Husky, but instead outcrossing with smaller breeds.
The appearance of the AKK can be described as looking at a Siberian Husky through the wrong end of binoculars. The markings, body shape, and coat are those of his larger relative, but on a much reduced scale. Along with almost wolf-like looks, the AKK has the distinctive eyebrows and mask colouration of the Husky, along with prick ears, and legs in good proportion to the body.

References:

http://embarkvet.com/resources/breeds/alaskan-klee-kais/
http://www.perfectdogbreeds.com/alaskan-klee-kai/
http://dogtime.com/dog-breeds/alaskan-klee-kai
http://www.dogzone.com/breeds/alaskan-klee-kai/
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustav_Klimt

milton avery painter

milton avery painter

What was Avery’s repertoire? His living room, Central Park, his wife Sally, his daughter March, the beaches and mountains where they summered; cows, fish heads, the flight of birds; his friends and whatever world strayed through his studio: a domestic, unheroic cast. But from these there have been fashioned great canvases, that far from the casual and transitory implications of the subjects, have always a gripping lyricism, and often achieve the permanence and monumentality of Egypt. [8]

Avery’s work is seminal to American abstract painting—while his work is clearly representational, it focuses on color relations and is not concerned with creating the illusion of depth as most conventional Western painting since the Renaissance has. Avery was often thought of as an American Matisse, especially because of his colorful and innovative landscape paintings. His poetic, bold and creative use of drawing and color set him apart from more conventional painting of his era. Early in his career, his work was considered too radical for being too abstract; when Abstract Expressionism became dominant his work was overlooked, as being too representational. [ citation needed ]

Milton avery painter
2. Barbara Haskell, Milton Avery (New York: Whitney Museum of American Art in association with Harper and Row, 1982) p.117.
Joann Moser Singular Impressions: The Monotype in America (Washington, D.C. and London: Smithsonian Institution Press for the National Museum of American Art, 1997)

Milton avery painter
Steeplechase was one of the three amusement parks built on Coney Island, as well as the longest-lasting one. Avery paints it as a slice-of-life, with bathers, families, and tourists populating the foreground. In the background is a tall wooden roller-coaster, a large sign advertising the park, and a covered carousel dotted with bright lights. Though he uses tones of deep gray and blue in the sky and muted pale gray for the beach itself, this is not a melancholy image; rather, it is one of joie de vivre, of delight in the city’s leisure offerings even on a cloudy day.
Critics often deem Avery’s work a fusion of the traditional and the modern, and this work exemplifies that assessment. The depiction of an urban scene is reminiscent of American painters such as Georgia O’Keeffe, John Sloan, and Edward Hopper, but like O’Keeffe, who heavily abstracted her work, as well as Arthur Dove, Avery deviates from realism to focus more on aesthetics than mimesis. The human figures are not proportionate, perspective is off, shapes are flat. Like both European and American modernists, Avery seeks to, as critic Hilton Kramer explains, “emphasize the essentially flat, two-dimensional nature of the painting surface ” and explore the way color and light create atmosphere, mood, and allusion.

Milton avery painter
Avery’s work is seminal to American abstract painting—while his work is clearly representational, it focuses on color relations and is not concerned with creating the illusion of depth as most conventional Western painting since the Renaissance has. Avery was often thought of as an American Matisse, especially because of his colorful and innovative landscape paintings. His poetic, bold and creative use of drawing and color set him apart from more conventional painting of his era. Early in his career, his work was considered too radical for being too abstract; when Abstract Expressionism became dominant his work was overlooked, as being too representational.
In 1924, he met Sally Michel, a young art student, and in 1926, they married. Her income as an illustrator enabled him to devote himself more fully to painting. The two had a daughter, March Avery, in 1932. For several years in the late 1920s through the late 1930s, Avery practiced painting and drawing at the Art Students League of New York. Roy Neuberger saw his work and thought he deserved recognition. Determined to get the world to know and respect Avery’s work, Neuberger bought over 100 of his paintings, starting with Gaspé Landscape, and lent or donated them to museums all over the world. With the work of Milton Avery rotating through high-profile museums, he came to be a highly respected and successful painter.

Young Couple (Husband and Wife) , 1963.
Installation view, Victoria Miro Mayfair, 7 June – 29 July 2017 .

References:

http://americanart.si.edu/artist/milton-avery-176
http://m.theartstory.org/artist/avery-milton/
http://www.wikiart.org/en/milton-avery
http://www.victoria-miro.com/artists/198-milton-avery/
http://www.getmiro.com/

joan miro fish

joan miro fish

A careful study of the abstract shapes and lines used here by the artist will help you to discover the fish, from the imaginative mind of Miro. The artist concentrates on the eye and scales for detail on the fish, allowing the viewer to recognise what is meant, and then constructing the rest of the image in their own mind. One commonly quoted comment from this Catalan painter, sculptor and draughtsman, which is particularly apt for this particular painting was “. In my opinion, mastering freedom means mastering simplicity. Then, at most, a line, a color, is enough to make the picture. ”
This simplicity of colour and line can be seen through out his career, as well as in the work of other famous modern artists from the 20th century, such as Piet Mondrian, Wassily Kandinsky, Mark Rothko, Paul Klee and Jackson Pollock. The Singing Fish, both in it’s simplicity and also the subject matter, has clear influences from prehistoric cave paintings which Miro is known to have studied and sought ideas from early on in his career. The bold colours and child-like capture of objects is typical of abstract art in general and more of these ideals can be found in the work of those artists mentioned here, as well as Pablo Picasso too.

Miró married Pilar Juncosa in Palma (Majorca) on 12 October 1929. Their daughter, María Dolores Miró, was born on 17 July 1930. In 1931, Pierre Matisse opened an art gallery in New York City. The Pierre Matisse Gallery (which existed until Matisse’s death in 1989) became an influential part of the Modern art movement in America. From the outset Matisse represented Joan Miró and introduced his work to the United States market by frequently exhibiting Miró’s work in New York. [27] [28]
In 1981, Miró’s The Sun, the Moon and One Star—later renamed Miró’s Chicago—was unveiled. This large, mixed media sculpture is situated outdoors in the downtown Loop area of Chicago, across the street from another large public sculpture, the Chicago Picasso. Miró had created a bronze model of The Sun, the Moon and One Star in 1967. The maquette now resides in the Milwaukee Art Museum.

Joan miro fish
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Joan miro fish
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Joan miro fish
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References:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Mir%C3%B3
http://www.catawiki.com/l/28661247-joan-miro-singing-fish
http://posterplus.com.au/genre/art-abstract/joan-miro-the-singing-fish.html
http://www.uinfootwear.com/products/fishes
http://simple.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Mir%C3%B3