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how to measure nipple shiele

how to measure nipple shiele

Nipple shields are used for myriad breastfeeding challenges, according to the University of Michigan (UM). They can be used in helping premature babies who don’t yet have the best sucking power; they can aid in pulling forward and shaping inverted or flat nipples; and for many of us, they can serve as a protection for nipples that feel like they’ve been rubbing up against a cheese grater and then doused in hot sauce. These convenient silicone tools can be a real lifesaver, but in order to achieve the optimum benefit, you must buy the correct shield for your need. Different sizes and shapes of nipple shields are used for different purposes, said UM, and it has nothing to do with the size of your breast.
The University of Michigan noted that smaller shields, like the 16 millimeter shields, are usually used for premature babies. The 20 millimeter shields are for average-sized newborns, and the 24 millimeter shields are usually for older babies or particularly large nipples.

How to measure nipple shiele
If you’ve already started using your breast pump and you’re feeling like you might not be using the right size, here are some pointers:
You can use a piece of string to measure around the base of your nipple and then divide by 3.14 (takes you back to circle geometry at school, right?). Or you can try measuring across the base of the nipple with a ruler. You want to get end up with the diameter or width of the base of your nipple. Be careful not to include any areola in the measurement. This can be tricky so doing it in front of a mirror or using a smart phone in selfie mode may be helpful.

How to measure nipple shiele
Pumping is often an integral part of the mother-baby relationship. Whether a mom is exclusively breast pumping or needs some independence from baby for work (or any other outing), it will be significantly more efficient when the pump is set up correctly. A big part of this setup includes flange size. Having a poorly sized flange can lead to breast damage, pain, and poor output, which can lead to premature weaning of baby from breast milk.
Getting an accurate measurement.

How to measure nipple shiele
When buying a new breast pump it is important to make sure that the breast shield not only works for your expressing needs and lifestyle, but also that it’s comfortable and easy to use, so you can get the maximum milk for your efforts.
If you answer yes to one or more of the following questions, you may be using the incorrect breastshield size.

How to measure nipple shiele
Understanding Medela Breast Shield Sizes
Your nipples or areola are turning white during and/or after pumping.

References:

http://spectra-baby.com.au/breastshield-sizing-guide/
http://www.spectrababyusa.com/how-to-know-if-your-breast-flanges-are-the-right-size/
http://milkbarbreastpumps.com.au/blogs/news/guide-to-choosing-the-right-breast-shield-size
http://www.medela.us/breastfeeding/articles/breast-shield-sizing-how-to-get-the-best-fit
http://www.lovelifedrawing.com/learning-from-egon-schiele-how-to-develop-your-own-style/

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jasper johns interview with david sylvester

jasper johns interview with david sylvester

JJ: They seemed to me pre-formed, conventional, depersonalized, factual, exterior elements.
JJ: Well all it is is whatever you are willing to say – all it is is whatever you say it is; however you can use it, that’s what it is. I think the experience of looking at painting involves putting the paint to use, taking the painting as something which exists. Then, what one sees one tends to suppose was intended by the artist. I don’t know that that is so. I think one works and makes what one makes and then one looks at it and sees what one sees. And I think that the picture isn’t pre-formed, I think it is formed as it is made; and might be anything. I think it resembles life, in that in any, say, ten-year period in one’s life, anything one may intend might be something quite different by the time the time is up – that one may not do what one had in mind, and certainly one would do much more than one had in mind. But, once one has spent that time, then one can make some statement about it; but that is a different experience from the experience of spending the time. And I think the experience of looking at a painting is different from the experience of planning a painting or of painting a painting. And I think the statements one makes about finished work are different from the statements one can make about the experience of making it.

That’s an interesting thought. A very good word, ‘melancholy’. It’s a beautiful word.
I’d have thought that in the past the whole idea of there being an avant-garde in England would have been something of a contradiction.

Born into a well-connected north-London Jewish family, Sylvester had trouble as a student at University College School and was thrown out of the family home. He wrote for the paper Tribune and went to Paris in 1947 where he met Alberto Giacometti, one of the strongest influences on him.
Sylvester is credited with coining the term kitchen sink originally to describe a strand of post-war British painting typified by John Bratby. [1] Sylvester used the phrase negatively but it was widely applied to other art forms including literature and theatre.

Jasper johns interview with david sylvester
About this Item: Arts Council of Great Britain, London, 1978. SOFTCOVER. 2nd Edition. Square Quarto size (4to) in illustrated stiff card covers, 64pp, plates etc . . . . . [ CONDITION : A well preserved FINE very clean and tight copy (slight tanning to covers) ] . . . . . . . . . . . . . To see more of our Art Monographs etc type DbbARTIST in the Keywords search box. . . . . . . . We always ship in PROTECTIVE CARD PARCELS. Seller Inventory # T16N1083

  • First Edition
  • Signed
  • Dust Jacket
  • Seller-Supplied Images
  • Not Printed On Demand

JJ: You said it.
DS: I’m asking you.
October 1965. It was printed in the exhibition catalogue Jasper Johns Drawings’ London, Arts Council of Great Britain, 1974, from which the present extracts are taken.

References:

http://frieze.com/article/about-david-sylvester
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Sylvester
http://www.abebooks.com/book-search/author/johns-jasper-interview-by-david-sylvester/
http://msu.edu/course/ha/452/johnsinterview.html
http://akronartmuseum.wordpress.com/tag/art-ale/

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nighthawk edward hopper where is it

nighthawk edward hopper where is it

Nighthawk edward hopper where is it
Hopper’s stunningly cinematic picture Nighthawks is one of the most reproduced paintings in the history of art. It is hard to know precisely why, except, perhaps, for the fact that we all recognize something of its truthfulness from within our own life experience. It is a picture that speaks of the alienating presence of the modern city. Several individuals – the nighthawks of the title – are gathered together in the brightly lit window of a downtown diner or cafe that spills its pale bluish light out into the street, casting a shadow on the pavement, yet barely holding a threatening inrush of darkness at bay. Beyond its reach, anything might be happening in the darkness. Psychologically speaking, these people are isolates, thrown together as a group, but also locked within themselves, prey to their own fears and fancies. It is a picture of city life in the small hours when an unnatural silence and an uncanny stillness take hold, tugging suggestively at the senses of hearing and vision.
ART EVALUATION
For analysis of paintings
by American realists
like Hopper, see:
How to Appreciate Paintings.

Nighthawk edward hopper where is it
Hopper was an acknowledged influence on the film musical Pennies from Heaven (1981), for which production designer Ken Adam recreated Nighthawks as a set. [28] Director Wim Wenders recreated Nighthawks as the set for a film-within-a-film in The End of Violence (1997). [26] Wenders suggested that Hopper’s paintings appeal to filmmakers because “You can always tell where the camera is.” [29] In Glengarry Glen Ross (1992), two characters visit a café resembling the diner in a scene that illustrates their solitude and despair. [30] The painting was also briefly used as a background for a scene in the animated film Heavy Traffic (1973) by director Ralph Bakshi. [31]
A number of model railroaders, most notably John Armstrong, have recreated the scene on their layouts. [43]

Jo’s handwritten notes about the painting give considerably more detail, including the interesting possibility that the painting’s evocative title may have had its origins as a reference to the beak-shaped nose of the man at the bar:
Starting shortly after their marriage in 1924, Edward Hopper and his wife, Josephine (Jo), kept a journal in which he would, using a pencil, make a sketch-drawing of each of his paintings, along with a precise description of certain technical details. Jo Hopper would then add additional information in which the themes of the painting are, to some degree, illuminated.

Nighthawk edward hopper where is it
Jo Hopper, Edward Hopper’s wife, is the enigmatic red-haired woman seated at the counter. Not only did she model for the painting, but she also kept a detailed journal of each of Hopper’s works. Her role as Hopper’s personal art historian may have even inspired the name behind the painting, where she describes one of the men in the painting as a “night hawk (beak) in dark suit, steel grey hat, black band, blue shirt (clean) holding cigarette.”
The diner in Hopper’s painting was apparently based on a real establishment in Greenwich Village; however, disputes over its legitimacy continue to give rise to heated discussions. Although now a vacant site, the diner was said to have sat between two streets; Greenwich Avenue and Seventh Avenue South.

Nighthawk edward hopper where is it
The sign above the cafe advertising cigars for $5 and the cash register seen in one of the windows outside suggest a kind of everyday American experience. The Nighthawks scene is silent and serene, further highlighting the intense feeling of isolation.
An important piece of Americana, the painting also has an ability to evoke a sense of nostalgia for an America of a time gone by. However, Nighthawks by Edward Hopper remains relevant even today as a subtle critique of the modern world, the world in which we all live, where an overwhelming sense of loneliness, and a deep desire, but ultimate inability, to connect with those around us prevails.

References:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nighthawks_(painting)
http://www.edwardhopper.net/nighthawks.jsp
http://blog.artsper.com/en/a-closer-look/artwork-analysis-nighthawks-by-edward-hopper/
http://www.widewalls.ch/edward-hopper-nighthawks-painting/
http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/paintings-analysis/nighthawks.htm

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hardin county medical center

hardin county medical center

Hardin county medical center
This clinic operates under a SLIDING SCALE model. This means that it MAY NOT be free depending on your income. You will be required to prove financial need in order to receive free services or services at a reduced cost. This is a health care center funded by the federal government. This means even if you have no insurance you can be covered. The center is also income based for those making an income. This health center can cover services such as checkups, treatment, pregnancy care (where applicable), immunizations and child care (where applicable), prescription medicine and mental and substance abuse where applicable. Contact them at the number provided for full details. Hardin County Regional Health Center is a Community Health Center. In order to get more information on this clinic, click on the icons below. You may be required to join for free in order to access full contact information.
765 Florence Rd , Savannah
1.04 miles away

Hardin county medical center
Rosiclare, IL 62982
Great care Then.

301 Tyson Av Paris, TN
All product and company names are trademarksв„ў or registeredВ® trademarks of their respective holders. Use of them does not imply any affiliation with or endorsement by them

Tip: Call “Hardin County General Hospital – Hardin Medical Center Home Supply” via phone number (731) 926-8212 for more detailed information about medical equipment and drugs which are being offered by the supplier and discuss about your insurance questions and concerns, payment requirements and application before making any purchase decision or before going directly to the store.
Disclaimer: HealthCare4PPL.com doesn’t endorse or promote any products. The information provided in this website comes directly from Medicare database and has not been checked or edited by HealthCare4PPL. You must meet all coverage rules for Medicare to help pay for any item.

Hospital Beds: Electric
Continuous Passive Motion (CPM) Devices

References:

http://www.ilhcgh.org/
http://www.familyassets.com/nursing-homes/tennessee/park-rest-hardin-county-health-center
http://www.healthcare4ppl.com/supplier/tennessee/savannah/hardin-medical-center-home-supply-59324.html
http://www.healthcare6.com/supplier/savannah-tn/hardin-county-general-hospital-60214.html
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mountains_and_Sea

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how did edward hopper die

how did edward hopper die

How did edward hopper die
Born in 1882 in Nyack, a small town on the Hudson River about forty miles north of New York City, Edward Hopper was the son of a local businessman. After spending a brief period at a school for illustrators, he attended the New York School of Art from 1900 to 1906. His teachers there were William Merritt Chase, Kenneth Hayes Miller, and Robert Henri. Henri, above all, became important to Hopper, not so much in artistic as in personal terms, for Henri was a man who set high standards for himself and his students. It was also he who pointed out that everyday American life contained an inexhaustible reservoir of new and untried subject matter.
The key accomplishment of the early period was an assimilation of Impressionism. Hopper’s palette grew lighter, his brushwork freer, and his observation more precise. His approach to motifs began to show a growing independence from any model or ideal, both in the American subjects and the Paris ones. Under the Impressionist spell, Hopper discovered the unique light of Paris: “The light was different from anything I had known,” he later recalled. “The shadows were luminous, more reflected light. Even under the bridges there was a certain luminosity.”

Edward Hopper, (born July 22, 1882, Nyack, N.Y., U.S.—died May 15, 1967, New York City), American painter whose realistic depictions of everyday urban scenes shock the viewer into recognition of the strangeness of familiar surroundings. He strongly influenced the Pop art and New Realist painters of the 1960s and 1970s.
Hopper was initially trained as an illustrator, but, between 1901 and 1906, he studied painting under Robert Henri, a member of a group of painters called the Ashcan School. Hopper travelled to Europe three times between 1906 and 1910, but he remained untouched by the experimental work then blossoming in France and continued throughout his career to follow his own artistic course. Although he exhibited paintings in the Armory Show of 1913, he devoted most of his time to advertising art and illustrative etchings until 1924. He then began to do such watercolours as Model Reading (1925), as well as oil paintings. Like the painters of the Ashcan School, Hopper painted the commonplaces of urban life. But, unlike their loosely organized, vivacious paintings, his House by the Railroad (1925) and Room in Brooklyn (1932) show still, anonymous figures and stern geometric forms within snapshot-like compositions that create an inescapable sense of loneliness. This isolation of his subjects was heightened by Hopper’s characteristic use of light to insulate persons and objects in space, whether in the harsh morning light ( Early Sunday Morning, 1930) or the eerie light of an all-night coffee stand ( Nighthawks, 1942).

How did edward hopper die
After returning from his final trip abroad in 1910, Hopper moved permanently to New York City and, in 1913, settled at 3 Washington Square North. This would be his home and studio for the rest of his life. That same year he sold his first painting, Sailing (1911), for $250 at the Armory show in New York. Though he never stopped painting, it would be 11 years before he sold another painting. During that time he continued to earn his living illustrating and, in 1915, he took up printmaking, producing some 70 etchings and dry points over the next decade. Like the paintings for which he would later become renowned, Hopper’s etchings embody a sense alienation and melancholy. One of his better known etchings, Night Shadows (1921) features the birds’-eye viewpoint, the dramatic use of light and shadow, and the air of mystery which would serve as inspiration for many film noir movies of the 1940s. Hopper continued to receive great acclaim for his etchings over the years and considered them an essential part of his artistic development. As he wrote, “After I took up etching, my painting seemed to crystallize.”
Edward Hopper was born into a comfortable, middle-class family in Nyack, New York, in 1882. His parents introduced Edward, and his older sister Marion, to the arts early in life; they attended the theatre, concerts and other cultural events, and visited museums. His father owned a dry goods store where Hopper sometimes worked as a teen. Hopper described him as “an incipient intellectual. less at home with his books of accounts than with Montaigne’s essays.” Both his parents were supportive of his artistic inclinations.

How did edward hopper die
At the age of 37, Edward Hopper received his first open invitation to do a one person exhibit, featuring some of this finest pieces of art. 16 pieces of his work were shown at the Whitney Club, and although none of the pieces were sold at this exhibit, it did point his career in a new direction, it got his art work out to the general public, and he became a more notable name in the type of work and the art forms which he most wanted to focus his career on, for the future works he would create.
Edward Hopper is widely acknoledged as the most important realist painter of twentieth-century America. But his vision of reality was a selective one, reflecting his own temperament in the empty cityscapes, landscapes, and isolated figures he chose to paint. His work demonstrates that realism is not merely a literal or photographic copying of what we see, but an interpretive rendering.

How did edward hopper die
In addition to his influence (see § Influence), Hopper is frequently referenced in popular culture.
Painting will have to deal more fully and less obliquely with life and nature’s phenomena before it can again become great. [65]

References:

http://www.britannica.com/biography/Edward-Hopper
http://m.theartstory.org/artist/hopper-edward/life-and-legacy/
http://www.edwardhopper.net/
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Hopper
http://www.thoughtco.com/egon-schiele-biography-4177835

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juan miro birthday

juan miro birthday

Juan miro birthday

“For me, a picture should be like sparks. It must dazzle like the beauty of a woman or a poem. It must have radiance; it must be like those stones which Pyrenean shepherds use to light their pipes.”
– Joan Miró

Miró was the son of a gold smith and a cabinet maker, and he was trained at the Escuela de Bellas Artes de la Llotja, as well as the Escuela de Arte de Francesco Galí, Circulo Artístico de Sant Lluc. Not many people know that he attended business school as well, and worked as a clerk in his teenage years. However, he abandonded the business world at an early age. Miró was among the first artists to develop automatic drawing as a way to undo previous established techniques in painting, representing the beginning of Surrealism as an art movement.

In 1974, Miró created a tapestry for the World Trade Center in New York City together with the Catalan artist Josep Royo. He had initially refused to do a tapestry, then he learned the craft from Royo and the two artists produced several works together. His World Trade Center Tapestry was displayed at the building [32] and was one of the most expensive works of art lost during the September 11 attacks. [33] [34]
Until the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, Miró habitually returned to Spain in the summers. Once the war began, he was unable to return home. Unlike many of his surrealist contemporaries, Miró had previously preferred to stay away from explicitly political commentary in his work. Though a sense of (Catalan) nationalism pervaded his earliest surreal landscapes and Head of a Catalan Peasant, it was not until Spain’s Republican government commissioned him to paint the mural The Reaper, for the Spanish Republican Pavilion at the 1937 Paris Exhibition, that Miró’s work took on a politically charged meaning. [29]

Juan miro birthday
Eventually, though, Miró came back to painting. Once his “search-and-destroy” quest ended, “Miró as master painter, the new, oddly adorable artist of popular fame, more or less” began, writes Holland Cotter in The New York Times.
But Miró was also restless with the conventions of surrealism. In 1927 he declared, “I want to assassinate painting.” And he tried. He created 12 groups of experimental works over a decade to try changing art. He cut down the amount of paint he used in his creations, used sandpaper and glue in others, experimented with different shapes and even made collages.

Juan miro birthday
From 1925 to 1928, under the influence of the Dadaists, Surrealists, and Paul Klee, Miró painted “dream pictures” and “imaginary landscapes” in which the linear configurations and patches of colour look almost as though they were set down randomly, as in The Policeman (1925). In paintings such as Dog Barking at the Moon (1926), he rendered figures of animals and humans as indeterminate forms. Miró signed the manifesto of the Surrealist movement in 1924, and the members of the group respected him for the way he portrayed the realm of unconscious experience. The poet André Breton, the chief spokesman of Surrealism, stated that Miró was “the most Surrealist of us all.”
Joan Miró was a Catalan painter who combined abstract art with Surrealist fantasy. His mature style evolved from the tension between his fanciful poetic impulse and his vision of the harshness of modern life. He worked extensively in lithography and produced numerous murals, tapestries, and sculptures for public spaces.

Juan miro birthday
He said, “The painting rises from the brushstrokes as a poem rises from the words. The meaning comes later.”
In 1976 the Joan Miró Foundation Centre of Contemporary Art Study was officially opened in the city of Barcelona and in 1979, four years before his death, he was named Doctor Honoris Causa by the University of Barcelona.

References:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Mir%C3%B3
http://www.findingdulcinea.com/features/profiles/m/joan-miro.html
http://www.britannica.com/biography/Joan-Miro
http://waldina.com/2018/04/20/happy-125th-birthday-joan-miro/
http://www.artsy.net/artwork/joan-miro-perro-ladrando-a-la-luna

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how to draw like egon schiele

how to draw like egon schiele

How to draw like egon schiele
Schiele died on 31 October 1918 after contracting Spanish flu, just 3 days after his pregnant wife Edith died of the same fate. The last drawing of Edith, titled Edith Schiele on Her Deathbed, captures her exhaustion and suffering.

I love death and I love life
Egon Schiele

How to draw like egon schiele
Mayko felt that the paper Schiele used was important to achieve the effects he did. Apparently he often used Japanese paper. She also thought he would have used dry brush techniques to get those rough marks creating these textures.

Her right shoulder, right knee and the left hand make a big triangle. Adding 2 points – the top of the head & the right elbow – you get a rectangle, which forms a kind of kite shape with the triangle. Marking these shapes very lightly gave me a kind of scaffolding before I started the proper drawing.

How to draw like egon schiele
Schiele was born in 1890 in Tulln, Austria. Even as a child he showed great interest in drawing and, consequently, enrolled in the Wiener Kunstgewerbeschule, a progressive Viennese art school, in 1906. However, because of his great proficiency and talent, the professors at the kunstgewerbeschule soon encouraged him to attend the more traditional Akademie der Bildenden Künste, where he studied with the painter Christian Griepenkerl. Frustrated with the extremely conservative methods of the school, Schiele and a number of young, avant-garde artists, including Anton Peschka, left the school in 1909 to exhibit together as the Neukunstgruppe.
In the summer of 1911, Schiele moved to Neulengbach on the outskirts of Vienna with his girlfriend, Wally Neuzil. However, the townspeople there were scandalized by Schiele’s art and unconventional lifestyle. As a result, they arrested him for supposedly seducing a young girl and imprisoned him for 24 days on the charge that he displayed his “immoral” drawings in the presence of children.

How to draw like egon schiele
We all wish we could draw like Egon Schiele. He could capture anybody. He saw right through a sitter and pulled out the inner character. Sad story though. They should do a movie. David Bowie was going to play him at one time but he waited too long as Schiele died at 28.
This show has a 220 volt cattle prod electric charge running through it. It’s not your typical art show trying (yawn) another attempt at a shock of the new. These powerful drawings bristle with energy. Pencil lines as hard won as railroad tracks tease and hammer out skulls, eye sockets, jaw lines, skeletal hands. They sculpt wasp- waisted models with economy. Not a line out of place here. Exaggeration and distortion madly dance over the structure of anatomy and laws of physics. Nor are they figure drawing exercises but x-rays that bare the soul of the sitter. Secrets rarely escaped this artists burning eye.

How to draw like egon schiele
“Present day standards are so very different than early, 20 th century Austria,” she insists. However, some galleries that show his work place with it an addendum of sorts, outlining his supposed misconduct. Kellir refuses to qualify Schiele’s work in such a manner, stating instead that he is a truly great artist who died too young, and should not be judged by modern day norms.
For modern art fans, the name Egon Schiele is one of the most revered names. For one fan an unbelievable occurrence has transformed his life. Finding something of true and significant importance to the world at large at a yard sale or charity shop rarely happens. Buyers scour shelves and piles of “secondhand everything,” hoping to come across a rare book, or a signed movie poster from the 1930s, or a drawing that is by one of the old masters or modern art heroes.

References:

http://www.lovelifedrawing.com/learning-from-egon-schiele-how-to-develop-your-own-style/
http://drawingatduke.blogspot.com/2009/12/egon-schiele-1890-1918.html?m=1
http://ltproject.com/2015112we-wish-we-could-draw-like-egon-schiele-html/
http://www.thevintagenews.com/2019/07/31/egon-schiele-art-found/
http://www.romper.com/p/how-to-find-the-right-size-nipple-shield-for-you-because-the-fit-makes-all-the-difference-15553069

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images paul klee

images paul klee

Images paul klee
Klee taught at the Bauhaus from January, 1921 to April, 1931. He was a “Form” master in the bookbinding, stained glass, and mural painting workshops and was provided with two studios. In 1922, Kandinsky joined the staff and resumed his friendship with Klee. Later that year the first Bauhaus exhibition and festival was held, for which Klee created several of the advertising materials. And in the same year, the first series of Bauhaus books is published with works by Gropius (International Architecture), Paul Klee, Adolf Meyer, Oskar Schlemmer, and Piet Mondrian. Klee welcomed that there were many conflicting theories and opinions within the Bauhaus: “I also approve of these forces competing one with the other if the result is achievement.”
In his early years, following his parent’s wishes, he focused on becoming a musician; but he decided on the visual arts during his teen years, partly out of rebellion and partly because of a belief that modern music lacked meaning for him. He stated, “I didn’t find the idea of going in for music creatively particularly attractive in view of the decline in the history of musical achievement.” As a musician, he played and felt emotionally bound to traditional works of the eighteenth and nineteenth century, but as an artist he craved the freedom to explore radical ideas and styles. At sixteen, Klee’s landscape drawings already show considerable skill.

Architect Renzo Piano constructed the Zentrum Paul Klee in June 2005. Located in Bern, the museum exhibits about 150 (of 4000 Klee works overall) in a six-month rotation, as it is impossible to show all of his works at once. Furthermore, his pictures require rest periods; they contain relatively photosensitive colors, inks and papers, which may bleach, change, turn brown and become brittle if exposed to light for too long. [106] The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has a comprehensive Klee collection, donated by Carl Djerassi. Other exhibitions include the Sammlung Rosengart in Luzern, the Albertina in Wien and the Berggruen Museum in Berlin. Schools in Gersthofen, Lübeck; Klein-Winternheim, Overath; his place of birth Münchenbuchsee and Düsseldorf bear his name.
Insula dulcamara, 1938, oil color and colored paste on newsprint on jute on stretcher frame, Zentrum Paul Klee, Bern

Images paul klee
Klee spent much of his adult life teaching at various universities and art schools, including the German Bauhaus School of Art and Düsseldorf Academy. During his tenure at Düsseldorf, he was singled out as a Jew by the Nazi party. The Gestapo searched his home and he was fired from his job. Some of his later works were also seized by the Nazis.
Around 1897, Klee started his diary, which he kept until 1918, and which has provided scholars with valuable insight into his life and thinking. During his school years, he avidly drew in his school books, in particular drawing caricatures, and already demonstrating skill with line and volume. He barely passed his final exams at the “Gymnasium” of Bern, where he qualified in the Humanities. With his characteristic dry wit, he wrote, “After all, it’s rather difficult to achieve the exact minimum, and it involves risks.” On his own time, in addition to his deep interests in music and art, Klee was a great reader of literature, and later a writer on art theory and aesthetics.

Images paul klee
Kunstmuseum Basel, Switzerland
Alphabetically under “K”
Kunstmuseum St.Gallen, Switzerland (mostly in German)
T�nzerpaar , 1923

From the winter semester of 1925/26 until 1930, Klee taught his Design course, alternating between lectures and exercises. From the summer semester of 1927 to 1930, he also offered an additional course that he described as “Weaving Design”. His Weaving teachings were especially focused on the planimetric design of surfaces, forming the largest part of his bundle of teaching notes entitled “Bildnerische Gestaltungslehre” (“Pictorial Design Teaching”). From 1927 to 1929, Klee’s pocket diary also notes formal teaching for 4th-semester students. Together with the Life Drawing course, which he also led in the winter semesters between 1927/28 and 1929/30, and the Free Painting course from 1927/28, these three years of teaching were a great burden on Klee. As a result, he handed in his notice and terminated his teaching on April 1, 1931.
Gropius appointed Josef Albers as a young master before he had even qualified as a journeyman. He was in charge of the preliminary course, where he formulated a pioneering approach to art education.

References:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Klee
http://www.wikiart.org/en/paul-klee
http://www.artcyclopedia.com/artists/klee_paul.html
http://www.bauhaus100.com/the-bauhaus/people/masters-and-teachers/paul-klee/
http://www.paulklee.net/

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georges seurat sunday afternoon on the island of la grande jatte

georges seurat sunday afternoon on the island of la grande jatte

Georges seurat sunday afternoon on the island of la grande jatte
In 2011, the cast of the US version of The Office re-created the painting for a poster to promote the show’s seventh-season finale. [24]
Seurat’s palette consisted of the usual pigments of his time [12] [13] such as cobalt blue, emerald green and vermilion. Additionally, Seurat used then new pigment zinc yellow (zinc chromate), predominantly for yellow highlights in the sunlit grass in the middle of the painting but also in mixtures with orange and blue pigments. In the century and more since the painting’s completion, the zinc yellow has darkened to brown—a color degeneration that was already showing in the painting in Seurat’s lifetime. [14] The discoloration of the originally bright yellow zinc yellow (zinc chromate) to brownish color is due to the chemical reaction of the chromate ions to orange-colored dichromate ions. [15] In the third stage during 1888–89 Seurat added the colored borders to his composition.

Georges seurat sunday afternoon on the island of la grande jatte
Why did he dedicate so much time to these preparatory sketches? As Pointillists, Seurat and Signac were particularly interested in playing with perception and experiment with optics, resulting in a comprehensive and meticulous painting process.
While the styles explored by Post-Impressionist artists are diverse, most featured flatness, formality, and exaggerated color in their work—characteristics that are evident in A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte.

Georges seurat sunday afternoon on the island of la grande jatte
Seurat’s first major pointillist work was Bathers at Asnieres (1883-4, National Gallery, London). Although rejected by the official Paris Salon, the work was shown at the Salon des Independants, an alternative event co-founded by Seurat himself, where he met fellow pointillists Paul Signac (1863-1935) and Henri-Edmond Cross (1856-1910), who helped him to further develop the idiom. Shortly afterwards Seurat began painting A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, which took him two years to finish. It was exhibited for the first time in May 1886 at the final Impressionist exhibition: an ironic occurrence since the work is now seen as one of the first major examples of Post-Impressionist painting (1880-95).
The essential meaning of A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte is far from clear. However art critics believe that it should be interpreted in comparison to its sister work Bathers at Asnieres. They believe that ‘La Jatte’ represents the French bourgeoisie, a decaying class that has fallen victim to lust and vice, and which is now in the shadows. In contrast, the sun is shining on the working class bathers of Asnieres, who represent the bright future of France.

Georges seurat sunday afternoon on the island of la grande jatte
Executed on a large canvas painted in 1884, A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte reveals everything magical about Seurat’s world – it’s beautiful and disturbing, sunlit and shadowed, silent and noisy, all at the same time. The painting’s dimensions are approximately 2 by 3 meters (7 by 10 feet), representing a truly huge size for pieces painted during this period.
A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte was painted in two sessions, the first between May 1884 and March 1885, and the second from October 1885 to May 1886. Seurat claimed he sat in the park for hours upon hours, creating numerous sketches of the various figures in order to perfect their form before he even thought about starting the actual painting.

Georges seurat sunday afternoon on the island of la grande jatte
Thanks to his involvement in the artist collective the Société des Artistes Indépendants, the daring young painter’s reputation was growing before A Sunday on La Grande Jatte —1884 debuted. But while his output was seminal, it was also cut short in 1891 when Seurat died of an undetermined disease at age 31.
Seurat’s groundbreaking techniques were a major turnoff for some critics at the Impressionist exhibit where A Sunday on La Grande Jatte —1884 debuted in 1886. Other observers sneered at the rigid profiles of Seurat’s subjects. Meant to recall Egyptian hieroglyphics, these poses were negatively compared to tin soldiers.

References:

http://mymodernmet.com/georges-seurat-a-sunday-afternoon-on-the-island-of-la-grande-jatte/
http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/paintings-analysis/sunday-afternoon-on-grande-jatte.htm
http://www.widewalls.ch/a-sunday-afternoon-on-the-island-of-la-grande-jatte-georges-seurat/
http://www.mentalfloss.com/article/63510/15-things-you-might-not-know-about-sunday-la-grande-jatte-1884
http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/paintings-analysis/sunday-afternoon-on-grande-jatte.htm

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georges seurat a sunday afternoon on the island of la grande jatte

georges seurat a sunday afternoon on the island of la grande jatte

Georges seurat a sunday afternoon on the island of la grande jatte

NOTE: Seurat’s 19th century colour palette comprised the usual colour pigments of the time, including vermilion, cobalt blue and emerald green. He also used the then-new pigment zinc yellow (zinc chromate), mainly for yellow highlights in the sunlit grass, but additionally in combination with blue and orange hues. Unfortunately, the zinc yellow has gradually darkened to a brownish colour, a process detectable even in Seurat’s lifetime.

For an interpretation of other pictures from the 19th and 20th centuries, see: Analysis of Modern Paintings (1800-2000).

Georges seurat a sunday afternoon on the island of la grande jatte
In 2011, the cast of the US version of The Office re-created the painting for a poster to promote the show’s seventh-season finale. [24]
Some of the characters are doing curious things. The lady on the right side has a monkey on a leash. A lady on the left near the river bank is fishing. The area was known at the time as being a place to procure prostitutes among the bourgeoisie, a likely allusion of the otherwise odd “fishing” rod. In the painting’s center stands a little girl dressed in white (who is not in a shadow), who stares directly at the viewer of the painting. This may be interpreted as someone who is silently questioning the audience: “What will become of these people and their class?” Seurat paints their prospects bleakly, cloaked as they are in shadow and suspicion of sin. [9]

Georges seurat a sunday afternoon on the island of la grande jatte
Georges Seurat, Study for “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte,” 1884 (Photo: Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)
Why did he dedicate so much time to these preparatory sketches? As Pointillists, Seurat and Signac were particularly interested in playing with perception and experiment with optics, resulting in a comprehensive and meticulous painting process.

Georges seurat a sunday afternoon on the island of la grande jatte
La Grande Jatte, toward Clichy, 2006, via wikipedia.org
A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte is both the best-known and largest painting Georges Seurat ever created on a canvas. It depicts people relaxing in a suburban park on an island in the Seine River called La Grande Jatte, a popular retreat for the middle and upper class of Paris in the 19th century.

Georges seurat a sunday afternoon on the island of la grande jatte
A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte
The planning and cast of Grande Jatte was notoriously as complex as the work itself and Seurat went through many sketched drafts before he arrived on the final plan for the painted piece. The cast comprised three dogs, eight boats and 48 people as they congregated for a Sunday afternoon in the sunny park.

References:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Sunday_Afternoon_on_the_Island_of_La_Grande_Jatte
http://mymodernmet.com/georges-seurat-a-sunday-afternoon-on-the-island-of-la-grande-jatte/
http://www.widewalls.ch/a-sunday-afternoon-on-the-island-of-la-grande-jatte-georges-seurat/
http://www.artble.com/artists/georges_seurat/paintings/a_sunday_afternoon_on_the_island_of_la_grande_jatte
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Sunday_Afternoon_on_the_Island_of_La_Grande_Jatte

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