henry moore reclining figures

henry moore reclining figures

Henry moore reclining figures
A 5.75 by 13 inches (14.6 cm × 33.0 cm) lead maquette was made by Moore in 1938, and sold by him to the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1939. An edition of nine bronzes was cast in 1946; one example is held by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, and another in the Leeds Art Gallery since 1991.
Reclining Figure 1938 (LH 192) is a small sculpture by Henry Moore of an sinuous abstracted human figure. An enlarged version was made in 1984 for the Oversea-Chinese Banking Corporation, Singapore. The resulting Large Reclining Figure (LH 192b) is some 9 metres (30 ft) long, making it the largest sculpture made by Moore.

Henry moore reclining figures
The sculpture can be viewed as an abstraction of a reclining female human figure, resting on one arm, hip and two legs, with the second arm raised, and a prominence on the chest suggesting a breast. It has no evident face.
The artist’s cast (0/6) was stolen from the Henry Moore Foundation at Perry Green, Hertfordshire on 15 December 2005. It is believed to have been hoisted onto the back of a stolen flatbed Mercedes lorry using a crane, cut up for scrap the same night, and shipped to Rotterdam, and then probably to the Far East. The sculpture was estimated to be worth £3m, but only £1,500 as scrap. The theft inspired German artist Fritz Balthaus in 2009 to cast bronze ingots of equivalent weight which, arranged in a form approximating Moore’s sculpture, are displayed as Pure Moore at the Federal Criminal Police Office in Berlin. [1]

Henry moore reclining figures
Conceived in 1946 and cast in bronze in an edition of 4 plus 1 artist’s proof.
Cast 1968
Conceived in 1946 and cast in bronze in an edition of 4 plus 1 artist’s proof.
Cast 1968

Henry moore reclining figures
Acquired by major UK collector
Signed ‘Moore’
Bronze, edition of 9
Conceived in 1938 and cast in 1968
Width: 33cm (13 inch) (including bronze base)

Henry moore reclining figures
Reclining Figure, like the majority of Moore’s public works in cities around the world, is based on the human figure—usually standing, sitting, or most often, reclining on a plinth. No other sculptor’s imagination was more manifestly connected to his past than Moore’s. His work consistently refers to women like his mother, a stalwart matriarch from a mining town who always nurtured and sheltered her family.
Acknowledged as the most important British sculptor of the 20th century, Moore was also an accomplished draftsman and printmaker. No other artist the past century has completed as many public commissions as Moore. He was given numerous official honors in Great Britain after World War II, including a Companion of Honor in 1955, and was made a member of the Order of Merit in 1963. These marks of distinction showed the extent to which modernist art had been absorbed and accepted by the traditionally conservative British cultural establishment.

References:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reclining_Figure_1969%E2%80%9370
http://www.artsy.net/artwork/henry-moore-reclining-figure-1964
http://www.bowmansculpture.com/artist/henry-moore/bb14/reclining-figure-one-arm-1938
http://henrysegerstrom.com/home/philanthropy/public-art/reclining-figure/
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reclining_Figure_1938

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