klee

klee

Klee
A few weeks later, World War I began. At first, Klee was somewhat detached from it, as he wrote ironically, “I have long had this war in me. That is why, inwardly, it is none of my concern.” Soon, however, it began to affect him. His friends Macke and Marc both died in battle. Venting his distress, he created several pen and ink lithographs on war themes including Death for the Idea (1915). He also continued with abstracts and semi-abstracts. In 1916, he joined the German war effort, but with behind the scenes maneuvering by his father, Klee was spared serving at the front and ended up painting camouflage on airplanes and working as a clerk.
Paul Klee was born as the second child of the German music teacher Hans Wilhelm Klee (1849-1940) and the Swiss singer Ida Marie Klee, nee Frick (1855-1921). His sister Mathilde (died 6 December 1953) was born on 28 January 1876 in Walzenhausen. Their father came from Tann and studied at the Stuttgart Conservatory singing, piano, organ and violin, where he met his future wife Ida Frick. Until 1931 Hans Wilhelm Klee was active as a music teacher at the Bern State Seminary in Hofwil near Bern. Due to this circumstances, Klee was able to develop his music skills through his parental home; his parents backed and inspired him until his death. In 1880, his family moved to Bern, where they moved 17 years later after numerous changes of residence into a house at the Kirchenfeld district. From 1886 to 1890, Klee visited the primary school and received, at the age of 7, violin classes at the Municipal Music School. He was so talented on violin that, aged 11, he received an invitation to play as an exceptional member of the Bern Music Association.

Klee
Paul Klee was born in Münchenbuchsee, Switzerland, as the second child of German music teacher Hans Wilhelm Klee (1849–1940) and Swiss singer Ida Marie Klee, née Frick (1855–1921). His sister Mathilde (died 6 December 1953) was born on 28 January 1876 in Walzenhausen. Their father came from Tann and studied at the Stuttgart Conservatory singing, piano, organ and violin, meeting there his future wife Ida Frick. Hans Wilhelm Klee was active as a music teacher at the Bern State Seminary in Hofwil near Bern until 1931. Klee was able to develop his music skills as his parents encouraged and inspired him until his death. In 1880, his family moved to Bern, where they eventually, in 1897, after a number of changes of residence, moved into their own house in the Kirchenfeld district (de). From 1886 to 1890, Klee visited primary school and received, at the age of 7, violin classes at the Municipal Music School. He was so talented on violin that, aged 11, he received an invitation to play as an extraordinary member of the Bern Music Association.
Paul Klee (German: [paʊ̯l ˈkleː]; 18 December 1879 – 29 June 1940) was a Swiss German artist. His highly individual style was influenced by movements in art that included Expressionism, Cubism, and Surrealism. Klee was a natural draftsman who experimented with and eventually deeply explored color theory, writing about it extensively; his lectures Writings on Form and Design Theory (Schriften zur Form und Gestaltungslehre), published in English as the Paul Klee Notebooks, are held to be as important for modern art as Leonardo da Vinci’s A Treatise on Painting for the Renaissance. He and his colleague, Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky, both taught at the Bauhaus school of art, design and architecture. His works reflect his dry humor and his sometimes childlike perspective, his personal moods and beliefs, and his musicality.

In the large molding pit are lying ruins, on which one partially hangs. They provide the material for the abstraction. […] The terrible the world, the abstract the art, while a happy world produces secularistic art. [74]

His works during this time include Camel (in rhythmic landscape with trees) as well as other paintings with abstract graphical elements such as betroffener Ort (Affected Place) (1922). From that period he created Die Zwitscher-Maschine (The Twittering Machine), which was later removed from the National Gallery. After being named defamatory in the Munich exhibition “Entartete Kunst”, the painting was later bought by the Buchholz Gallery, New York, and then transferred in 1939 to the Museum of Modern Art. The “twittering” in the title refers to the open-beaked birds, while the “machine” is illustrated by the crank. [77]

Known for his unique pictorial language and innovative teachings at the Bauhaus, Paul Klee had far-reaching influence on 20th-century modernism. In an early attempt to master color, he associated himself with the group Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), working closely with friend and future Bauhaus colleague Wassily Kandinsky. While engaged with artistic theory, Klee also admired children’s art, wanting his own style to be similarly unaffected. And his dream-like pictures made him popular with the Surrealists, though he never officially became one. Klee’s work can be humorous, his fantastic drawn subjects conveying a playful sense of absurdity, as with his famous Twittering Machine (1922). Later in his career, he began to build up thicker painted surfaces and simplify his compositions, replacing precise line-work with fewer, bolder forms. Klee’s art and lessons on color theory would greatly impact later generations of artists, including, significantly, the Abstract Expressionists and Color Field painters.
Known for his unique pictorial language and innovative teachings at the Bauhaus, Paul Klee had far-reaching influence on 20th-century modernism. In an early attempt to master color, he associated himself with the group Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), working closely with friend and future Bauhaus colleague Wassily Kandinsky. While engaged with artistic theory, Klee also admired children’s art, wanting his own style to be similarly unaffected. And his dream-like pictures made him popular with the Surrealists, though he never officially became one. Klee’s work can be humorous, his fantastic drawn subjects conveying a playful sense of absurdity, as with his famous Twittering Machine (1922). Later in his career, he began to build up thicker painted surfaces and simplify his compositions, replacing precise line-work with fewer, bolder forms. Klee’s art and lessons on color theory would greatly impact later generations of artists, including, significantly, the Abstract Expressionists and Color Field painters.

Klee was left-handed but he could paint with both hands. Many of his Bauhaus students were so impressed by his artistic skills that they dedicated their own works to him.
From the winter semester of 1925/26 until 1930, Klee taught his Design course, alternating between lectures and exercises. From the summer semester of 1927 to 1930, he also offered an additional course that he described as “Weaving Design”. His Weaving teachings were especially focused on the planimetric design of surfaces, forming the largest part of his bundle of teaching notes entitled “Bildnerische Gestaltungslehre” (“Pictorial Design Teaching”). From 1927 to 1929, Klee’s pocket diary also notes formal teaching for 4th-semester students. Together with the Life Drawing course, which he also led in the winter semesters between 1927/28 and 1929/30, and the Free Painting course from 1927/28, these three years of teaching were a great burden on Klee. As a result, he handed in his notice and terminated his teaching on April 1, 1931.

References:

http://www.wikiart.org/en/paul-klee
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Klee
http://www.artsy.net/artist/paul-klee
http://www.bauhaus100.com/the-bauhaus/people/masters-and-teachers/paul-klee/
http://www.hillspet.com/dog-care/dog-breeds/alaskan-klee-kai

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