franz marc

franz marc

Franz marc
In 1912, Franz Marc met with Robert Delaunay, who used color and design methods, in a futuristic manner; this led to the futurist movement. Marc became fascinated in this futuristic style, as well as in cubism, and it became a major influence for the work which he produced during this year, as well as the work which came forth following this period as well. Stark works, and those which were extremely advanced for their time, including abstract nature, and bold colors and sharp angles, were some of the changes that were seen in the pieces which Franz Marc created, following the meeting he had with Delaunay, who introduced him to this new movement, and to this new style, that presented abstract, and new methods to present the same drawn out works of the past.
While in Paris, Franz Marc responded enthusiastically to the works of Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Picasso, and the Expressionists; later, he was impressed by the Henri Matisse exhibition in Munich in 1910.In Paris, he also got involved with local artists, and many famous actors. Not only did this allow him to gain more experience, and learn from their influences, it also allowed Franz Marc to draw many of his styles, and artistic forms from the works of individuals which he was around often. Not only did his style follow the Parisian style, he also took much influence from the location, and the pieces that he created, during this early phase of his career.

Marc made some sixty prints in woodcut and lithography. Most of his mature work portrays animals, [5] usually in natural settings. His work is characterized by bright primary color, an almost cubist portrayal of animals, stark simplicity and a profound sense of emotion. Even in his own time, his work attracted notice in influential circles. Marc gave an emotional meaning or purpose to the colors he used in his work: blue was used to portray masculinity and spirituality, yellow represented feminine joy, and red encased the sound of violence. After the National Socialists took power, they suppressed modern art; in 1936 and 1937, the Nazis condemned the late Marc as an entarteter Künstler (degenerate artist) and ordered approximately 130 of his works removed from exhibition in German museums. His painting Landscape With Horses was discovered in 2012 along with more than a thousand other paintings, in the Munich apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt whose dealer father, Hildebrand Gurlitt, was a collector of Modernist art the Nazis called “degenerate”. [6]
In 1911, Marc founded the Der Blaue Reiter journal, which became the center of an artist circle, along with Macke, Wassily Kandinsky, and others who had decided to split off from the Neue Künstlervereinigung movement.

Franz marc
Marc’s philosophy can be seen in works such as Blue Horses (1911), in which the powerfully simplified and rounded outlines of the horses are echoed in the rhythms of the landscape background, uniting both animals and setting into a vigorous and harmonious organic whole. In this painting, as in his other mature works, Marc used a well-defined symbology of colour: blue, yellow, and red each stood for specific emotional qualities.
Franz Marc, (born February 8, 1880, Munich, Germany—died March 4, 1916, near Verdun, France), German painter and printmaker who is known for the intense mysticism of his paintings of animals. He was a founding member of Der Blaue Reiter (“The Blue Rider”), an association of German Expressionist artists.

Franz marc
Marc remained in the Academy for two years before taking an extended trip to Paris. There, he saw the works of Impressionists and Japanese woodcuts, which led him to adopt a more modern approach in terms of color and simplified lines. During his second trip to Paris in 1907, Marc discovered the works of Cubists (Pablo Picasso) and Post-Impressionists (Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh). The combination of these influences was evident in Marc’s early paintings such as Woman in the Wind by the Sea (1907) and Jumping Dog Schlick (1908). His early style was naturalistic, and the artist gravitated toward the natural world, especially animals. The artist had a deep affection for animals and spent many hours studying their movement and behavior. For Marc, animals had spirituality and innocence that man long lost. In paintings like Horse in a landscape (1910), he even tried to emulate the animal’s point of view and experience of the world.
In 1911, Marc founded the Der Blaue Reiter journal, which became the center of an artist circle, along with Macke, Wassily Kandinsky, and others who had decided to split off from the Neue Künstlervereinigung movement.

Franz marc
In 1910 he gets acquainted with August Macke and in the same year he joins the New Artists’ Association, Munich (Neue Künstlervereinigung, or NKVM). But already in 1911 Franz Marc splits off from NKVM together with Macke, Kandinsky and other artists in order to take part in arrangement of something completely new. The Blue Rider circle of artists becomes the flagship, bringing the new meaning of arts of the new century. Read about the circle of artists in more detail here.
In his creative work Franz Marc was always drawn to portraying animals in natural surroundings. The basis of his emotional painting is bright, consistent primary colours, simplified cubist shapes. Besides, the painter characterized the main colours he used: blue meant masculinity and spirituality, yellow represented female joy, red was the sound of violence, etc.

Franz marc
‘Tiger’ is a typical example of Franz Marc’s painting style. It is a fusion of several influences: the expressive and symbolic use of color that he discovered in the paintings of Van Gogh and Gauguin combined with the fragmented and prismatic compositions of various Cubist styles.
Franz Marc was a German Expressionist painter who formed Der Blaue Reiter group with Wassily Kandinsky. They were part of an artistic movement who were searching for spiritual truth through their art. Marc believed that color had a vocabulary of emotional keys that we instinctively understand, much in the same way that we understand music. This language of color was one element that Marc used to raise his art to a higher ‘spiritual’ plane; another was his choice of subject.

Franz marc
Franz Marc was born in Munich in 1880. There, he began studies in philology and theology in 1899. Just one year later, he studied at the Munich Academy of Fine Arts, under Gabriel von Hackl and Wilhelm von Diez. When Marc travelled to Paris in 1903, he was impressed by the painters of the Impressionist movement, but also by Toulouse-Lautrec, Pierre Bonnard, Edouard Vuillard and Vincent van Gogh. After his return, the artist especially focussed on pictures of animals: simplified and stylised. He tried to captivate the souls of these beings on canvas.
When one of Kandinsky’s pictures for the third exhibit of the NKVM was later rejected, Marc and Kandinsky withdrew from the group in 1911 and formed a loose group of artists: the Blue Rider group. In the autumn of 1911, they prepared the “The Blue Rider” Almanac in what is known as the Münter House. The first exhibit of the “The Blue Rider” editorial team took place to this end in Heinrich Tannhauser’s art gallery in 1911. The Almanac was then published by Piper-Verlag in 1912. That same year, August Macke and Franz Marc again travelled to Paris where they visited Robert Delaunay, whose futuristic style of painting inspired them. After that, Marc’s paintings increasingly made use of abstraction. However, he never fully departed from his figurative animal symbolism.

References:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franz_Marc
http://www.britannica.com/biography/Franz-Marc
http://www.wikiart.org/en/franz-marc
http://www.wassilykandinsky.net/person-franz_marc.php
http://www.artyfactory.com/art_appreciation/animals_in_art/franz_marc.htm
http://www.murnau.de/en/franz-marc.html
http://www.artyfactory.com/art_appreciation/animals_in_art/franz_marc.htm