famous collage artists kurt schwitters

famous collage artists kurt schwitters

Famous collage artists kurt schwitters
Turns to Collage
Gesamtkunstwerk (Total Art)

Famous collage artists kurt schwitters
In 1923, Kurt Schwitters began the construction of the Merzbau, one of the most ambitious of his Merz projects. He ultimately transformed six rooms of his family’s house in Hanover. The process was a gradual one and involved contributions of art and objects from Schwitters’ ever-expanding network of friends. He completed the first room in 1933 and expanded from there into other parts of the house until fleeing to Norway in 1937. A bombing raid destroyed the building in 1943.
The economic and political collapse of the German government at the end of World War I had a profound impact on Karl Schwitters’ art. His painting turned toward Expressionist ideas, and he began picking up litter in the streets as found objects to incorporate into works of art.

Famous collage artists kurt schwitters
German Painter, Collagist, and Writer
Directly affected by the depressed state of Germany following World War I, and the modernist ethos of the Dada movement, Kurt Schwitters began to collect garbage from the streets and incorporate it directly into his art work. The resulting collages were characterized by their especially harmonious, sentimental arrangements and their incorporation of printed media. He actively produced artistic journals, illustrated works, and advertisements, as well as founding his own Merz journal. He wrote poems and musical works that played with letters, lacing them together in unusual combinations, as he’d done in the collages, in the hope of encouraging his audience to find their own meanings. His multiple avant-garde efforts culminated in his large merzbau creations. These works, collaborations with other avant-garde artists, would start with one object to which others were added, causing the whole piece to change and evolve over time, growing to great proportions that forced the viewer to actually experience, rather than simply view, the art.

Schwitters started a second Merzbau while in exile in Lysaker nearby Oslo, in 1937 but abandoned it in 1940 when the Nazis invaded; this Merzbau was subsequently destroyed in a fire in 1951. His hut on the Norwegian island of Hjertøya, near Molde, is also frequently regarded as a Merzbau. For decades this building was more or less left to rot, but measures have now been taken to preserve the interior. [40]
Photos of the Merzbau were reproduced in the journal of the Paris-based group abstraction-création in 1933-34, and were exhibited in MoMA in New York in late 1936.

Associated with the Dada movement, painter, poet, and mixed-media artist Kurt Schwitters is best known for his collage and assemblage works in which he transformed appropriated imagery and text from print media into dynamic and layered compositions. Schwitters studied at the Dresden Academy of Art with Otto Dix and George Grosz, and after showing in Berlin in 1918 was introduced to Dadaists Raoul Hausmann, Hannah Höch, and Jean Arp. It was at this time he began making assemblages from materials found discarded on the streets of his home city, Hannover, intending to reflect the ruined state of German culture; he called the works Merzbilder after the German word “Kommerz,” as in Merzbild 1A. The mental doctor (1919). Unlike the Berlin Dadaists, however, Schwitters’ main concern was art-making, not political activism, and he is remembered best for his innovative use of mixed-media and masterful sense of composition.
Associated with the Dada movement, painter, poet, and mixed-media artist Kurt Schwitters is best known for his collage and assemblage works in which he transformed appropriated imagery and text from print media into dynamic and layered compositions. Schwitters studied at the Dresden Academy of Art with Otto Dix and George Grosz, and after showing in Berlin in 1918 was introduced to Dadaists Raoul Hausmann, Hannah Höch, and Jean Arp. It was at this time he began making assemblages from materials found discarded on the streets of his home city, Hannover, intending to reflect the ruined state of German culture; he called the works Merzbilder after the German word “Kommerz,” as in Merzbild 1A. The mental doctor (1919). Unlike the Berlin Dadaists, however, Schwitters’ main concern was art-making, not political activism, and he is remembered best for his innovative use of mixed-media and masterful sense of composition.

Famous collage artists kurt schwitters
C 50 letzte Vögel und Blumen (C 50 Last Birds and Flowers), 1946
Collage on paper mounted on card
6.5 x 5.5 inches (16.51 x 13.97 cm)
NEW YORK—Nahmad Contemporary is pleased to announce Kurt Schwitters: A Selection of Collages, scheduled to run July 2 through August 24, 2019. Presenting the works of 20 th century’s great master of collage and forefather of assemblage, the exhibition will highlight a collection of abstract collages that the artist created between the 1920s and 1940s.

Famous collage artists kurt schwitters
Schwitters spent the last one-and-half years of the war working as a drafter in a factory just outside Hanover. He was conscripted into the 73rd Hanoverian Regiment in March 1917, but exempted on medical grounds in June of the same year. By his own account, his time as a draftsman influenced his later work, and inspired him to depict machines as metaphors of human activity.
Schwitters worked in several genres and media, including Dadaism, Constructivism, Surrealism, poetry, sound, painting, sculpture, graphic design, typography, and what came to be known as installation art. He is most famous for his collages, called Merz Pictures.

References:

http://www.thoughtco.com/kurt-schwitters-4628289
http://m.theartstory.org/artist/schwitters-kurt/
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_Schwitters
http://www.artsy.net/artist/kurt-schwitters
http://www.nahmadcontemporary.com/exhibitions/kurt-schwitters-a-selection-of-collages
http://www.wikiart.org/en/kurt-schwitters
http://www.ducksters.com/history/art/ancient_egyptian_art.php