gas edward hopper

gas edward hopper

Experts also believe that Gas represents a refuge as well for lonely people travelling through the night on a mission to get somewhere.
Many sources within the media have made use of the inspirational work of Edward Hopper including films and television programmes.

Gas edward hopper
The subject was a composite of several gas stations Hopper had visited. [1] According to Hopper’s wife, the gas station motif was something he had wanted to paint for a long time. Hopper struggled with the painting. He had begun to produce new paintings at a slower rate than before, and had trouble finding suitable gas stations to paint. Hopper wanted to paint a station with the lights lit above the pumps, but the stations in his area only turned the lights on when it was pitch dark outside, to save energy. [2]
Gas is a 1940 painting by the American painter Edward Hopper. It depicts an American gas station at the end of a highway.

Gas edward hopper
DAVIS, Stuart, Town Square,1925-1926, Watercolor, gouache, ink and pencil on paper, (15 1/2 × 22 7/8 in.), The Newark Museum, Newark, New Jersey.
2 The genesis of the painting suggests that Gas had been nurtured in the imagination of the artist for a long time. Hopper painted Gas during the summer of 1940, which he spent, like most summers since 1934, in Truro, Massachusetts, where Hopper and his wife Josephine had acquired a summer house overlooking Cape Cod Bay. During his first years on Cape Cod, his biographer records, Hopper would go take drives, finding inspiration in his new surroundings and sketching small charcoal drawings and watercolors out of the window of his car (Levin, 1998, 77). In the years before 1940, the artist struggled to find new subjects. Although gas stations materialized on every street corner in the 1930s, it is not until that summer of 1940 that Hopper finally applied himself to the task. In the sketchbook entry for Gas, Josephine notes that he had wanted to paint one for years (Levin, 1995, 278). However, the gas station has no real-life counterpart. Gas was not painted from nature or “from the fact,” as Hopper used to phrase it—it was “improvised” (Goodrich, 132). Although Hopper would often paint from life and his studies were usually produced on location, he said to his biographer that “he had made [Gas] up from memories of different places” in the Truro area. He was 58 when he painted Gas. His biographer recounts that “as old age and infirmity made traveling about more difficult, he adapted, by transforming his surrounding through the filter of his imagination” (Levin, 1998, 10). The preparatory sketches for Gas separately focus on the man-made objects and the surrounding environment; it is only in the later studies that the three-pump station and the wilderness are merged to compose the unique setting we find in the completed work (Levin, 1995a, 278).

Gas edward hopper
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While this might look like that all-american 40s/50s gas station around the corner it is not. Or maybe it is, who knows? Hopper claims this was totally improvised and it isn’t based on any gas station in particular. But we’ve all learned a lesson or two from Matt Groenig lying to us that Springfield was to represent “anytown” and then it turns out Springfield actually is real!

Gas edward hopper
Museum of Art, Williamstown, Massachusetts.
This source is a credited source, it was published by Northwestern University. It includes some well explained opinion about Hopper’s painting Gas(1940).

Gas edward hopper
The significance of this painting was recognized soon after its completion when The Art Institute of Chicago purchased it for $3,000. Today it is the most requested and sought after image in their collection.
Office at Night depicts a woman and a man alone in an office. The woman, ostensibly the secretary, stands at a filing cabinet looking at a piece of paper that seems to have just fallen on the floor. The man at the desk seems oblivious to her. A shaft of light pours in through the window. In the lower left corner of the image there is a typewriter, indicative of functionality and perhaps, the woman’s role. Hopper elevates what might be a simple scene of everyday life within an office through an extremely raised angle of perspective. The psychological tension between the figures depicted within the room is achieved through the resultant compression of space which limits the figures’ ability to move about.

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References:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_(painting)
http://journals.openedition.org/transatlantica/8462
http://www.sartle.com/artwork/gas-edward-hopper
http://blogs.lt.vt.edu/bondzhang/architecture-design/summer-studio/edward-hopper-light-and-color/
http://m.theartstory.org/artist/hopper-edward/artworks/
http://www.etsy.com/market/edward_hopper_gas
http://www.edward-hopper.org/gas/